1. No one wants to be known as the woman who cried sexism for fear of being labeled a tattletale, a liability, or, at the very least, not worth the trouble. And yet, it’s only through these stories that we can begin to understand that the statistics aren’t the result of some fluke or mass oversight, but a very real problem that needs to be solved.
  2. Content Used to Be King. Now It’s the Joker.  — Climate Confidential — Medium

    4. I’m tired of making rich, white dudes seem more thoughtful than they are. Yeah, I said it. Something about this whole game smacks of sexism, on top of the usual “let them eat cake” attitude corporate types have toward creative types in general (“I know! Why don’t we hire a journalist to write this think-piece? They’re all desperate for cash, they’d be happy to take this on for way less than we pay anyone else.”) Most of the ghost writers and content producers I know are women, ditto the journalists-turned-internal editors and “content strategists” for companies, and 90 percent of their work is for male CEOs. There are various factors at work here, of course. Founding and leading a successful company entitles one to a certain amount of cachet and that’s just giving credit where it’s due. Plus there are legitimate thought leaders in every industry, including media and journalism (although they’re all also mostly white dudes). But in addition to all that, underpinning this new content world is an unsettling image of a bunch of women scurrying around behind the scenes to make the boss-man look good, and an even more unsettling message: Your ideas will only be taken seriously if they are articulated by a white, male CEO.
  3. tinyampersand:

theonlyhoneyelle:

(via University Study on Sexism In BBC’s Doctor Who (Infographic))

Telling. Not perfect, as the people who did the study are wisely quick to point out, but certainly telling.

YUP.

    tinyampersand:

    theonlyhoneyelle:

    (via University Study on Sexism In BBC’s Doctor Who (Infographic))

    Telling. Not perfect, as the people who did the study are wisely quick to point out, but certainly telling.

    YUP.

    Reblogged from: tinyampersand
  4. In 2014, The Classical World Still Can’t Stop Fat-Shaming Women : Deceptive Cadence : NPR:


After a week full of discussions about gender and the newsroom in the U.S., a pile of weekend reviews arrived from London, courtesy of five older male critics writing about an emerging Irish mezzo-soprano named Tara Erraught. Erraught is singing Octavian in the Strauss opera Der Rosenkavalier at the Glyndebourne Festival, which opened Saturday night.
What is stunningly apparent is just how much a woman’s body matters onstage — way more, if these five critics are to be believed, than her voice, her technique, her musicality or any other quality…
——————-
I find it astounding that across five widely read publications, not a single editor saw fit to go back to the writer and challenge what he had written. Yes, visuals matter — even more now, in the age of live broadcasts — but these critics have seized this as license to forget why anybody shows up at an opera house to begin with.

    In 2014, The Classical World Still Can’t Stop Fat-Shaming Women : Deceptive Cadence : NPR:

    After a week full of discussions about gender and the newsroom in the U.S., a pile of weekend reviews arrived from London, courtesy of five older male critics writing about an emerging Irish mezzo-soprano named Tara Erraught. Erraught is singing Octavian in the Strauss opera Der Rosenkavalier at the Glyndebourne Festival, which opened Saturday night.

    What is stunningly apparent is just how much a woman’s body matters onstage — way more, if these five critics are to be believed, than her voice, her technique, her musicality or any other quality…
    ——————-
    I find it astounding that across five widely read publications, not a single editor saw fit to go back to the writer and challenge what he had written. Yes, visuals matter — even more now, in the age of live broadcasts — but these critics have seized this as license to forget why anybody shows up at an opera house to begin with.
  5. Don’t underestimate how much antagonism there is toward women and how many people wish we could turn the clock back. One of the things people always say to you if you get upset is, don’t take it personally, but listen hard to what’s going on and, please, I beg you, take it personally.

    Nora Ephron in 1996 perfectly captures why women today take Jill Abramson’s firing so personally. 

    Read it. 

    (via think-progress)

    Reblogged from: think-progress
  6. Spitting, Stalking, Rape Threats: How Gun Extremists Target Women | Mother Jones

    Ever since the Sandy Hook massacre, a small but vocal faction of the gun rights movement has been targeting women who speak up on the issue—whether to propose tighter regulations, educate about the dangers to children, or simply to sell guns with innovative security features. The vicious and often sexually degrading attacks have evolved far beyond online trolling, culminating in severe bullying, harassment, invasion of privacy, and physical aggression. Though vitriol flows from both sides in the gun debate, these menacing tactics have begun to alarm even some entrenched pro-gun conservatives.
  7. this was a spur-of-the-moment question about a controversial topic. Mr. Sorkin can’t be expected to speak for the entire film and TV industry with one improvised answer. He doesn’t even have to write female protagonists if he doesn’t want to — but he shouldn’t pretend that the reason male-driven movies get made while women’s scripts sit in a bin is because the former are of a higher quality.
  8. it’s just a bit galling that Hollywood has taken one of the greatest stories of feminist triumph in the last century and made it about a dude.
  9. A Censored History of Ladies in YA Fiction | BOOK RIOT

  10. L'Wren Scott Was Remembered As a ‘Girlfriend’ - The Cut

    In 2008, in a profile in New York, Scott said, “I just want to be known for what I do, not who I know.” And again in a 2013 interview with the London Times, she said: “I don’t court that life. I’d rather be a worker bee. I’m a fashion designer. I don’t want to be defined as someone’s girlfriend. You always wonder if people will pay attention to the hard work that goes into what you do. And when you’re taking on something on your own, it’s your company, your investment — your life.”

    Overall, the media failed her.

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