wnyc:

Here’s The Thing: Alec Baldwin sits down with Jamie and Alex Bernstein, to hear about growing up with the maestro, Leonard Bernstein. Bernstein had three children: Jamie, Alexander and Nina. And while they knew him in the tux and tails, they also knew him as the dad who loved games – he was a killer at anagrams – and always up for tennis or squash or skiing or touch football. Listen here.

Currently listening to this, as Bernstein is one of my favorite composers.

wnyc:

Here’s The Thing: Alec Baldwin sits down with Jamie and Alex Bernstein, to hear about growing up with the maestro, Leonard Bernstein. Bernstein had three children: Jamie, Alexander and Nina. And while they knew him in the tux and tails, they also knew him as the dad who loved games – he was a killer at anagrams – and always up for tennis or squash or skiing or touch football. Listen here.

Currently listening to this, as Bernstein is one of my favorite composers.

(via lincolncenter)

nyrbclassics:

From now until October 4, 2012 you can listen to the BBC Radio 4 adaptation of Tove Jansson’s Summer Book, read by Phyllida Law and Sophie Thompson.

listening to this now (although the office probably isn’t the best place to do so, given likely interruptions).

nyrbclassics:

From now until October 4, 2012 you can listen to the BBC Radio 4 adaptation of Tove Jansson’s Summer Book, read by Phyllida Law and Sophie Thompson.

listening to this now (although the office probably isn’t the best place to do so, given likely interruptions).

"My own philosophy on storytelling is that people don’t want to be told how to feel but they do want to be told what to pay attention to. One of the most basic ways to do this when you’re telling a story is to use what’s sometimes called a “pointing arrow,” or signposting. Right before something happens, drop in a little phrase like…”and that’s the moment when everything changed”…or…” and that’s when things got interesting.” Those phrases are like little arrows that tell the listeners: pay attention to what’s about to happen because it’s important. (We use these mercilessly in Radiolab, too much perhaps). Anyhow. I felt like as I was living inside the story I’m telling you now, I’d periodically bump into these pointing arrows, but I could never predict when they’d appear or where they’d lead."

Jad Abumrad shares insights on storytelling from Radiolab’s origin story

(via explore-blog)

(Source: explore-blog)

University of Texas tables deal to buy second station for its KUT-FM in Austin - Current.org

shaneguiter:

The University of Texas Board of Regents has tabled a decision to purchase “classic hits” KXBT-FM as a sister station for its KUT-FM in Austin “while questions about the proposal are answered,” reports Radio Insight. The initial plan was to buy the station for $6 million and shift KUT’s musical programming to KXBT.

whoa, I didn’t know that was even being considered.

About Ask Me Another : NPR

Puzzlemaster Will Shortz and Wait Wait… Don’t Tell Me! host Peter Sagal walk into a bar… No, it’s not the start of a joke. It’s the essence of Ask Me Another, a rambunctious hour that blends brainteasers and local pub trivia night with comedy and music. Host Ophira Eisenberg invites in-studio guests and listeners alike to stretch their noggins, tickle their funny bones, and enjoy witty banter and guitar riffs from house musician Jonathan Coulton.

For an hour, listeners can play along as Eisenberg puts questions to a rotating band of puzzle gurus, audience members and special mystery guests, who then takes a turn in the contestant’s chair facing trivia games written especially for him or her. What you’ll hear resembles the casual intimacy of game night at a friend’s house: one where scores are forgotten in favor of hilarious gaffes.

Whaa? I’m surprised I’m just now hearing about this show (it “premieres” this Friday).

Escape! - Radiolab

Comment by The Former 786 on this Radiolab episode (I was seriously thinking this myself):

Did anyone else think that “Ben” from the first segment about Houdini sounded EXACTLY like Adam Scott from the TV show Parks & Recreation on NBC? It’s uncanny. AND, Adam Scott’s character is named Ben Wyatt. I’m not entirely convinced it WASN’T him. Radio Lab, are you trying to pull a fast one on us?

"I have nothing now but praise for my life. I’m not unhappy. I cry a lot because I miss people. They die and I can’t stop them. They leave me and I love them more. … What I dread is the isolation. … There are so many beautiful things in the world which I will have to leave when I die, but I’m ready, I’m ready, I’m ready."

Maurice Sendak on Fresh Air (via aesalazar)

wnycradiolab:

Heck yes, Jad Abumrad is a Genius. Congratulations Mr. MacArthur Fellow!

(Source: macfound.org)

BBC iPlayer - Music Feature: Why Do Women Die in Opera?

I’d never really considered this, even in my limited music history studies… but it is a very good question. (h/t author @matthewgallaway)

This is especially interesting as I’m reading The Finkler Question, in which one of the main characters is obsessed with the idea of a weak, beautiful woman dying in his arms, just like they do in his favorite operas.