Paula Deen’s Cook Tells of Slights, Steeped in History - NYTimes.com

For 22 years, Mrs. Charles was the queen of the Deen kitchens. She helped open the Lady & Sons, the restaurant here that made Ms. Deen’s career. She developed recipes, trained other cooks and made sure everything down to the collard greens tasted right.

“If it’s a Southern dish,” Ms. Deen once said, “you better not put it out unless it passes this woman’s tongue.”

The money was not great. Mrs. Charles spent years making less than $10 an hour, even after Ms. Deen became a Food Network star. And there were tough moments. She said Ms. Deen used racial slurs. Once she wanted Mrs. Charles to ring a dinner bell in front of the restaurant, hollering for people to come and get it.

“I said, ‘I’m not ringing no bell,’ ” Mrs. Charles said. “That’s a symbol to me of what we used to do back in the day.”

For a black woman in Savannah with a ninth-grade education, though, it was good steady work. And Ms. Deen, she said, held out the promise that together, they might get rich one day.

Now, Ms. Deen, 66, is fighting empire-crushing accusations of racism, and Mrs. Charles, 59 and nursing a bad shoulder, lives in an aging trailer home on the outskirts of Savannah.

2brwngrls:

phillipcody:

The Disney Store is now selling this racist consumerist garbage.  This is precisely why all of Disney’s and Johnny Depp’s claims that they respect Native Americans and that they have been “making good” with Indians is total horseshit.  Disney will make hundreds of millions of dollars off of the film and merchandise, and Depp will cash his massive paycheck, and Native peoples will be left with the continued legacy of misinformation and racist imagery.

If you’ve ever wondered what American Indians really think about Tonto, and not just what Disney claims we think about the character, here is some further reading to consider:  ”An Open Letter to Johnny Depp’s Tonto” & “Johnny Depp as Tonto: I’m Still Not Feeling ‘Honored’

THIS IS SHAMEFUL. 

this is not okay.

(Source: threeastronauts, via 2brwngrls)

"These same friends are also all good people who have told me how they are outraged by racism, hurt by it, bewildered. And sometimes that’s what makes it so frustrating: how difficult it is to talk about race even with them, people I know are on my side, because the conversation inevitably becomes one about how they’re not racist, how they’re not even, when it comes down to it, white. The bulk of these conversations end with me reassuring them that I know they mean well, and then insisting as gently as I know how that if I have to be yellow, if blacks have to be blacks, and so on, then they have to be white. The truth is that they don’t realize that it is the particular privilege of the white to say they don’t “feel” white, that they’re not bound to “white” culture. And that casual dismissal, that simple, blind, unwitting privilege, always makes me angry. I understand my anger might be misplaced, unfair, ungenerous. At its deepest level, it’s probably born of envy. It’s so easy for them to casually disavow their race, as if it were a matter of personal choice. If only it were so easy for the rest of us."

Yellow Peril And The American Dream by Catherine Chung, and powerful and incisive essay about racism, white privilege, and how even the best of intentions can’t erase centuries of institutionalized prejudice. (via therumpus)

Saving this to read later — Chung’s Forgotten Country is one of the best books I read last year.

(via therumpus)

How to Get a Black Woman Fired

thenationmagazine:

A handy six-step guide guide brought to you by Channing Kennedy, Colorlines.com’s self-appointed white male correspondent. (Seriously though, it’s brilliant. Read it.)

thesmithian:


The cover stands out for its cast of black and Hispanic caricatures with exaggerated features reminiscent of early 20th century race cartoons. Also, because there are only people of color in it, grabbing greedily for cash. It’s hard to imagine how this one made it through the editorial process. Compounding the…problem with the image is the fact that race has been a key backdrop to the subprime crisis. The narrative of the crash on the right has been the blame-minority-borrowers line, sometimes via dog whistle, often via bullhorn…the record is clear: minorities were disproportionately targeted by predatory lending, which has always gone hand in hand with subprime. Even when they qualified for prime loans that similar-circumstance whites got, they were pushed into higher-interest subprimes…minority borrowers were disproportionately victimized in the bubble. But BusinessWeek here has them on the cover bathing in housing-ATM cash, implying that they’re going to create another bubble.

more, at the Columbia Journalism Review.

It’s 2013 and crap like this gets ok’d by editors?!! UGH.

thesmithian:

The cover stands out for its cast of black and Hispanic caricatures with exaggerated features reminiscent of early 20th century race cartoons. Also, because there are only people of color in it, grabbing greedily for cash. It’s hard to imagine how this one made it through the editorial process. Compounding the…problem with the image is the fact that race has been a key backdrop to the subprime crisis. The narrative of the crash on the right has been the blame-minority-borrowers line, sometimes via dog whistle, often via bullhorn…the record is clear: minorities were disproportionately targeted by predatory lending, which has always gone hand in hand with subprime. Even when they qualified for prime loans that similar-circumstance whites got, they were pushed into higher-interest subprimes…minority borrowers were disproportionately victimized in the bubble. But BusinessWeek here has them on the cover bathing in housing-ATM cash, implying that they’re going to create another bubble.

more, at the Columbia Journalism Review.

It’s 2013 and crap like this gets ok’d by editors?!! UGH.

(via racialicious)

"What bothers me more than anything else about these jokes is how boring they are. I’ve heard variations of them countless times from people who think they’re hilarious, and act as if no one has ever unearthed such comedic gems before, and they’re always wrong. They are the scraps of humor actual comics left on the table a decade earlier in their careers after they learned that playing to people’s dumbest, most stereotypical assumptions is not actually the same thing as joke-making. But the laziness of MacFarlane’s brand played particularly poorly at the Oscars given the movie industry’s very real problems with both women and derivativeness, in a celebration of what’s supposed to be Hollywood’s best, the things that the profits of things like The Avengers make it possible to keep in production."

Why Seth MacFarlane Bombed The Oscars—And What It Says About Hollywood | ThinkProgress

nerdshares:

Oh wow, a white male comedian who isn’t bothered by racist and sexist jokes. So brave.

Well, bully for you, Marc Maron. The rest of us thought it was pretty awful.

nerdshares:

Oh wow, a white male comedian who isn’t bothered by racist and sexist jokes. So brave.

Well, bully for you, Marc Maron. The rest of us thought it was pretty awful.

theatlantic:

The Banality of Seth MacFarlane’s Sexism and Racism at the Oscars

The best moment of Seth MacFarlane’s Oscars hosting gig may have come late in the night when, in announcing Meryl Streep, he said “our next presenter needs no introduction” … and then just walked away.
If only he’d kept his mouth shut more frequently.
Read more. [Image: AP]


UGH. AMY & TINA OSCARS HOSTS 2014

theatlantic:

The Banality of Seth MacFarlane’s Sexism and Racism at the Oscars

The best moment of Seth MacFarlane’s Oscars hosting gig may have come late in the night when, in announcing Meryl Streep, he said “our next presenter needs no introduction” … and then just walked away.

If only he’d kept his mouth shut more frequently.

Read more. [Image: AP]

UGH. AMY & TINA OSCARS HOSTS 2014