The chemistry between Bell and Dohring’s characters still flares up, although their attraction seems to have cooled a smidge over the years. The relationship between Veronica and her PI dad (Enrico Colantoni), however, seems as tight as ever. As one expects from the mind behind the show (Thomas co-wrote the screenplay with show producer Diane Ruggiero), the wit and smartassery are aplenty.
 
(via Review: Veronica Mars | Slackerwood)

Written amidst the other films I’ve seen this week.  I’m so tired.

The chemistry between Bell and Dohring’s characters still flares up, although their attraction seems to have cooled a smidge over the years. The relationship between Veronica and her PI dad (Enrico Colantoni), however, seems as tight as ever. As one expects from the mind behind the show (Thomas co-wrote the screenplay with show producer Diane Ruggiero), the wit and smartassery are aplenty.
(via Review: Veronica Mars | Slackerwood) Written amidst the other films I’ve seen this week. I’m so tired.


It seems strange to select such a New York City-centric film as Spike Lee’s 25th Hour for Lone Star Cinema, but the epilogue for the movie was filmed in our state. So, here we are.

(via Lone Star Cinema: 25th Hour | Slackerwood)

It seems strange to select such a New York City-centric film as Spike Lee’s 25th Hour for Lone Star Cinema, but the epilogue for the movie was filmed in our state. So, here we are.

(via Lone Star Cinema: 25th Hour | Slackerwood)


British actor Elba speaks with a sort of closed-teeth diction to emulate Mandela’s speech pattern in Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom. While his strange pronunciation can be slightly distracting, he plays Mandela as dashing, determined and convinced of his right cause. Surprisingly though, it’s Harris who impresses the most here. Her Winnie is fierce and beautiful, discovering her grit and her own skill for leadership as her husband is held for decades on Robben Island. Harris shows immense talent and range in her supporting role.

[Review: Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom | Slackerwood]

British actor Elba speaks with a sort of closed-teeth diction to emulate Mandela’s speech pattern in Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom. While his strange pronunciation can be slightly distracting, he plays Mandela as dashing, determined and convinced of his right cause. Surprisingly though, it’s Harris who impresses the most here. Her Winnie is fierce and beautiful, discovering her grit and her own skill for leadership as her husband is held for decades on Robben Island. Harris shows immense talent and range in her supporting role.

[Review: Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom | Slackerwood]


One can’t really view this film as “based on a true story,” because it isn’t. Certainly these characters are based on real people who had real dealings together (well, Disney and Travers anyway).  But as perfectly as Thompson plays this version of Travers, the author in Saving Mr. Banks seems a flimsy copy of the real thing. As I watched the film, I recalled a New Yorker article I had read some years ago about Travers and her thoughts on Disney’s musical (get it while it’s free!). We are told nothing here of the author’s adult relationships, and the character demurs when asked about children. The grumpy Travers of the film, we are led to believe, was formed and inspired by the events of her childhood — never mind the years afterward.

[Review: Saving Mr. Banks | Slackerwood]

One can’t really view this film as “based on a true story,” because it isn’t. Certainly these characters are based on real people who had real dealings together (well, Disney and Travers anyway).  But as perfectly as Thompson plays this version of Travers, the author in Saving Mr. Banks seems a flimsy copy of the real thing. As I watched the film, I recalled a New Yorker article I had read some years ago about Travers and her thoughts on Disney’s musical (get it while it’s free!). We are told nothing here of the author’s adult relationships, and the character demurs when asked about children. The grumpy Travers of the film, we are led to believe, was formed and inspired by the events of her childhood — never mind the years afterward.

[Review: Saving Mr. Banks | Slackerwood]

No one asked for it, but here you go: my favorite films from 2013.
Top two (that’s why they merit larger squares in the collage): Frances Ha and Before Midnight (my review)
The rest, in order of collage appearance: In a World… (my review), 12 Years a Slave (my review), Gravity, Philomena, 20 Feet from Stardom, and The Act of Killing (my review).
I’m going to do another collage with the other movies I really liked — the honorable mention list is pretty long.

No one asked for it, but here you go: my favorite films from 2013.

Top two (that’s why they merit larger squares in the collage): Frances Ha and Before Midnight (my review)

The rest, in order of collage appearance: In a World… (my review), 12 Years a Slave (my review), Gravity, Philomena, 20 Feet from Stardom, and The Act of Killing (my review).

I’m going to do another collage with the other movies I really liked — the honorable mention list is pretty long.

Sombras de Azul moves in quiet meditation, with Maribel’s reflections about her brother spoken over scenes of landscape, cityscape or beach. People in white congregate on the streets for an unnamed sacred event. Maribel sits silently in a graveyard under a tree, the audio of her narration softly spooling out a tall tale Carlos once told her about a snake.
[AFF Review: Sombras de Azul | Slackerwood]

Sombras de Azul moves in quiet meditation, with Maribel’s reflections about her brother spoken over scenes of landscape, cityscape or beach. People in white congregate on the streets for an unnamed sacred event. Maribel sits silently in a graveyard under a tree, the audio of her narration softly spooling out a tall tale Carlos once told her about a snake.

[AFF Review: Sombras de Azul | Slackerwood]

I sincerely hope that 2013 is the break-out year for Chiwetel Ejiofor, when he gets the attention from filmgoers (and filmmakers) he so deserves. With his phenomenal, determined performance as Solomon Northup in Steve McQueen’s film 12 Years a Slave (and his part in the upcoming dramatization of Half of a Yellow Sun), it could happen!
[Review: 12 Years a Slave | Slackerwood]
I’m not subtle about my appreciation for Mr. Ejiofor.

I sincerely hope that 2013 is the break-out year for Chiwetel Ejiofor, when he gets the attention from filmgoers (and filmmakers) he so deserves. With his phenomenal, determined performance as Solomon Northup in Steve McQueen’s film 12 Years a Slave (and his part in the upcoming dramatization of Half of a Yellow Sun), it could happen!

[Review: 12 Years a Slave | Slackerwood]

I’m not subtle about my appreciation for Mr. Ejiofor.