1. [What] my mother meant when she said you can’t eat beauty was that you can’t rely on how you look to sustain you. What is fundamentally beautiful is compassion for yourself and for those around you. That kind of beauty enflames the heart and enchants the soul. It is what got Patsey in so much trouble with her master, but it is also what has kept her story alive to this day. We remember the beauty of her spirit even after the beauty of her body has faded away.

    Read Lupita Nyong’o’s Moving ESSENCE Speech — Vulture

    If she wins Sunday night (FINGERS CROSSED), her speech is gonna be amazing, y’all.

  2. It’s a fantasy, that when we lose weight, everything wrong in our lives is going to be right — that means our relationships are going to be right, we’re going to feel completely differently about ourselves," says Geneen Roth, a New York Times bestselling author of books on eating who also leads retreats and workshops, and who herself lost between 60 and 70 pounds in her late twenties. "People are shocked to find out that this thing that they’ve been longing for and waiting for and working for is not what they thought it was.
  3. 
I think that it is a rare artistic director that is willing to hire a black ballerina and promote her through the ranks. The problem begins with the corps de ballet. I think that artistic directors like the corps to look homogenous. The corps is the backdrop to the story, a forest, a snowstorm, a flock of birds or a field of flowers. One red poppy in a field of yellow daffodils draws the audience’s eyes to the one poppy. However, I don’t think the answer is to cull the poppy. I think it’s to scatter more poppies about the field of daffodils. With more black ballerinas in the corps, there will inevitably be more black ballerinas rising. I think that if these artistic directors or perhaps the boards of professional ballet companies want to draw larger more heterogeneous audiences, they need to be willing to change the look of the corps de ballet.
I suspect that the resistance to raising black ballerinas through the ranks might be due to an old-fashioned way of looking at beauty. Our ideal of a perfect ballerina is based on Russian ballet with its willowy blondes. If a director does not appreciate the aesthetics of African beauty, he will not want to promote a black ballerina to the status of prima, because the prima is supposed to be the most beautiful dancer. She represents the aesthetics of classical ballet, which right now are Eurocentric.

[Michaela DePrince – Junior Company, Dutch National Ballet | DanceTabs]

    I think that it is a rare artistic director that is willing to hire a black ballerina and promote her through the ranks. The problem begins with the corps de ballet. I think that artistic directors like the corps to look homogenous. The corps is the backdrop to the story, a forest, a snowstorm, a flock of birds or a field of flowers. One red poppy in a field of yellow daffodils draws the audience’s eyes to the one poppy. However, I don’t think the answer is to cull the poppy. I think it’s to scatter more poppies about the field of daffodils. With more black ballerinas in the corps, there will inevitably be more black ballerinas rising. I think that if these artistic directors or perhaps the boards of professional ballet companies want to draw larger more heterogeneous audiences, they need to be willing to change the look of the corps de ballet.

    I suspect that the resistance to raising black ballerinas through the ranks might be due to an old-fashioned way of looking at beauty. Our ideal of a perfect ballerina is based on Russian ballet with its willowy blondes. If a director does not appreciate the aesthetics of African beauty, he will not want to promote a black ballerina to the status of prima, because the prima is supposed to be the most beautiful dancer. She represents the aesthetics of classical ballet, which right now are Eurocentric.

    [Michaela DePrince – Junior Company, Dutch National Ballet | DanceTabs]

  4. Rita Hayworth has always been known to have had her hair dyed and her hairline raised through electrolysis to make her look less Latin. Bob Schiffer, a famous Hollywood makeup man who worked with Hayworth during most of her career, never said Hayworth was anything less than a glorious beauty, but he gave interviews about how minor adjustments needed to make her look as luscious as she did. “One eye was a little smaller than the other,” said Schiffer about Hayworth, “so I used to take a false eyelash to it, just to even her eyes out.”

    #ideals of beauty

    I’ve had a Rita Hayworth bio in my Goodreads queue for a while — I think it’s time to move it up.

    Reblogged from: warnerarchive
  5. tylercoates:


De Rossi, who has been very honest about her struggles with eating disorders early in her career, now must deal with a new kind of pressure from critics and audiences: staying youthful and beautiful while also “aging gracefully.” That her appearance has been cited as a reason why the fourth season of Arrested Development isn’t as good as the previous three, suggesting her face is so distracting that it’s impossible for anyone to laugh at Mitch Hurwitz’s jokes, is more disheartening that the notion that she’s succumbed to pressure and had any sort of plastic surgery.

I wrote about the sexist and stupid conversation people are having about Portia de Rossi’s appearance on the new Arrested Development.

THANK YOU.

    tylercoates:

    De Rossi, who has been very honest about her struggles with eating disorders early in her career, now must deal with a new kind of pressure from critics and audiences: staying youthful and beautiful while also “aging gracefully.” That her appearance has been cited as a reason why the fourth season of Arrested Development isn’t as good as the previous three, suggesting her face is so distracting that it’s impossible for anyone to laugh at Mitch Hurwitz’s jokes, is more disheartening that the notion that she’s succumbed to pressure and had any sort of plastic surgery.

    I wrote about the sexist and stupid conversation people are having about Portia de Rossi’s appearance on the new Arrested Development.

    THANK YOU.

    Reblogged from: flavorpill
  6. think-progress:

A new study scientifically proves why Obama’s comments about Kamala Harris being “by far the best-looking” attorney were a really big deal.

    think-progress:

    A new study scientifically proves why Obama’s comments about Kamala Harris being “by far the best-looking” attorney were a really big deal.

    Reblogged from: think-progress
  7. michelledean:

    I demand that you watch this video with Cheryl Strayed talking about her Vogue photoshoot. (by Back Fence PDX)

    Reblogging because 1) SUGAR! and 2) I need to finish watching it later.

    Reblogged from: michelledean
  8. mayhopearise:

    savyjaye:

    today i did something for me.

    it was scary and hard, and if it weren’t for some amazing friends i’d have backed out a thousand times before i even made it to the salon.

    i had three best friends in high school. as of this month, one is engaged and the other two are married (one with the most beautiful 6 month old imaginable). most days i feel like my facebook news feed is filled with announcements from my college friends getting engaged or married or pregnant. i am 21 years old, and most days i feel like i’m already behind in life.

    for three years i’ve wanted to shave my head and for three years i’ve allowed guys to tell me that i would be less of a woman, have less beauty, or less value without my hair. for three years, i’ve had a dream that i’ve refused to indulge in because i thought that my hair was the sum of my worth and of my femininity.

    i was wrong.

    today, i left the salon with a shaved head.
    and today, i left the salon feeling the most feminine i ever have.

    this post isn’t about a hair cut, though, but about what i allow to define myself. for too long i’ve been wrong. it isn’t my hair and it isn’t a relationship. and even though some days it can be hard to remember, i can’t find my value in our culture’s definition of beauty.



    i am worth more.
    and you, you are worth more too.

    this. this. this. this.

    so proud of you, savannah! and girlfrandddd, you are freaking rockin the shaved head too! beauty!

    Reblogged from: thebladeissharp
  9. think4yourself:


Weightlifter Sarah Robles is an incredible athlete, but outside the world of squats and snatches, barely anyone knows her name. And even though she’s the U.S.’s best chance at an Olympic medal, she’ll never get the fame or fortune that come so easily to her fellow athletes — in part because, at 5 feet, 10.5 inches and 275 pounds, she doesn’t fit the ideal of thin, toned athletic beauty.

(via The Strongest Woman In America Lives In Poverty)

    think4yourself:

    Weightlifter Sarah Robles is an incredible athlete, but outside the world of squats and snatches, barely anyone knows her name. And even though she’s the U.S.’s best chance at an Olympic medal, she’ll never get the fame or fortune that come so easily to her fellow athletes — in part because, at 5 feet, 10.5 inches and 275 pounds, she doesn’t fit the ideal of thin, toned athletic beauty.

    (via The Strongest Woman In America Lives In Poverty)

    Reblogged from: apsies
  10. This video made me happy.

    (from NYTimes)

    But black hair and the black body generally have long been a site of political contest in American history and in the American imagination. Against this backdrop, the transition movement has a political dimension — whether transitioners themselves believe it or not. Demonstrating this level of self-acceptance represents a powerful evolution in black political expression. If racial politics has led to an internalization of self-loathing, then true transformation will come internally, too. It will not be a performative act. Saying it loud: “I’m black and I’m proud” is one thing. Believing it quietly is another. So the transition movement is much more profound and much more powerful — and I believe it offers lessons in self-acceptance for people of all hues and all genders.

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