1. "It doesn’t end my involvement with Texas history," Collins said. "It’s my intention to keep accumulating, keep collecting, and once I’ve lived with whatever I buy for a month, I’ll be shipping it here. I’m kind of a bit of a magnet now for things relating to the Texas revolution." That’s a fascinating idea—that Phil Collins is now, essentially, the ongoing curator and buyer for an all-new Texas revolution museum at the Alamo grounds—and though it’ll take some time before it’s actually on display, the first items will be shipped over in October.
  2. vintageblackglamour:

Thank you Ruby Dee. Thank you… “I believe that often young performers, lacking a continuity of experience, lacking a knowledge of the history of entertainment, of the tradition and great contributions that our people have made to theater, may tend to feel that a whole new world begins with each newcomer. Not so…. I maintain that we actresses must concern ourselves more with the fate of each other, and of the younger actresses coming along, by helping to find material and getting it produced and by promoting scholarships for intensive training.” ~ Ruby Dee, from an article she wrote for the April 1966 issue of Negro Digest entitled “Tattered Queens: Some Reflections on the Negro Actress.” In this photo, she is shown with baseball legend Jackie Robinson in a scene from the movie, “The Jackie Robinson Story,” where she played his wife, Rachel. Ms. Dee died at the age of 91 on Wednesday, June 11, 2014 at her home in New Rochelle, New York. Photo: Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library

    vintageblackglamour:

    Thank you Ruby Dee. Thank you… “I believe that often young performers, lacking a continuity of experience, lacking a knowledge of the history of entertainment, of the tradition and great contributions that our people have made to theater, may tend to feel that a whole new world begins with each newcomer. Not so…. I maintain that we actresses must concern ourselves more with the fate of each other, and of the younger actresses coming along, by helping to find material and getting it produced and by promoting scholarships for intensive training.” ~ Ruby Dee, from an article she wrote for the April 1966 issue of Negro Digest entitled “Tattered Queens: Some Reflections on the Negro Actress.” In this photo, she is shown with baseball legend Jackie Robinson in a scene from the movie, “The Jackie Robinson Story,” where she played his wife, Rachel. Ms. Dee died at the age of 91 on Wednesday, June 11, 2014 at her home in New Rochelle, New York. Photo: Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library

    Reblogged from: 2brwngrls
  3. Jim Hubbard, the director of United in Anger: A History of ACT UP, and David France did a public debate. It was co-sponsored by Visual Aids and you can watch it on YouTube and it’s really really fascinating. At one point they open up for questions and the first question to David is: Why do you have no women or people of color in [How to Survive a Plague]? And he says, well I wanted to focus on wealthy white men because they had the time to devote to activism.

    Now as a person who has interviewed 168 surviving members of ACT UP New York, I can tell you that’s not historically correct.
  4. gradientlair:

    Maya Angelou (April 4, 1928-May 28, 2014). Dancer. Singer. Poet. Author. Speaker. Educator. Creative. Inspirer. Mother. Black woman. Beautiful. She means so much to me. Everything. May she rest in peace. 

    "My mission in life is not merely to survive, but to thrive; and to do so with some passion, some compassion, some humor, and some style."

    Reblogged from: womenwhokickass
  5. 0jack:

RIP, Dr. Angelou. You will be missed. (Pictured: Malcolm X, Maya Angelou.)

    0jack:

    RIP, Dr. Angelou. You will be missed. (Pictured: Malcolm X, Maya Angelou.)

    Reblogged from: 0jack
  6. I am so, so afraid for my generation – we who think that validation of an event through social media represents an understanding of a historical process.
  7. newyorker:

    image

    As South Africa and the rest of the world awaits the verdict on the Oscar Pistorius case, Charlayne Hunter-Gault writes about the female judge who will ultimately decide his guilt: http://nyr.kr/1mvz2Kh
    Reblogged from: washingtonpost
  8. fordlibrarymuseum:

The Shirley Peck Barnes Papers, 1967-2005, are now open for research.
This collection contains correspondence, newsletters, newspaper clippings, research materials, and artifacts relating to Shirley Peck Barnes’ involvement with Friends of Children of Vietnam and “Operation Babylift,” the evacuation of orphans from Saigon during the closing weeks of the Vietnam War. After the evacuation in 1975 Barnes remained active in Babylift adoptee matters and eventually wrote The War Cradle: The Untold Story of Operation Babylift.
For more information view the collection finding aid.
Image: Vietnamese refugee children on an Operation Babylift flight arrive at San Francisco International Airport on April 5, 1975 (White House Photograph A3854-04A)

    fordlibrarymuseum:

    The Shirley Peck Barnes Papers, 1967-2005, are now open for research.

    This collection contains correspondence, newsletters, newspaper clippings, research materials, and artifacts relating to Shirley Peck Barnes’ involvement with Friends of Children of Vietnam and “Operation Babylift,” the evacuation of orphans from Saigon during the closing weeks of the Vietnam War. After the evacuation in 1975 Barnes remained active in Babylift adoptee matters and eventually wrote The War Cradle: The Untold Story of Operation Babylift.

    For more information view the collection finding aid.

    Image: Vietnamese refugee children on an Operation Babylift flight arrive at San Francisco International Airport on April 5, 1975 (White House Photograph A3854-04A)

    Reblogged from: ourpresidents
  9. Girls on Film: Girlfriends, the most influential film about female friendship you’ve never heard of - The Week

  10. 
The orange-and-black velvet ensemble Marian Anderson wore during her historic Easter Sunday performance on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on April 9,1939, is on view to mark the 75th anniversary of the concert. 
American History Museum, 2nd Floor, East Wing
Washington, DC
April 8. 2014 - September 7, 2014

    The orange-and-black velvet ensemble Marian Anderson wore during her historic Easter Sunday performance on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on April 9,1939, is on view to mark the 75th anniversary of the concert. 

    American History Museum, 2nd Floor, East Wing

    Washington, DC

    April 8. 2014 - September 7, 2014

    Reblogged from: coolchicksfromhistory
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