1. usnatarchives:

"Jenny on the Job" was a series of posters issued by the Public Health Services in 1943 created by artist Kula Robbins. This specific poster is titled "Jenny on the Job - Wears styles designed for victory", depicting what women working in the factories and around machines were expected to wear. In today’s Pieces of History post, you can read more about how women’s pivotal role in the workforce during WWII greatly influence the fashion trends of the decade. National Archives Identifier: 514684.

    usnatarchives:

    "Jenny on the Job" was a series of posters issued by the Public Health Services in 1943 created by artist Kula Robbins. This specific poster is titled "Jenny on the Job - Wears styles designed for victory", depicting what women working in the factories and around machines were expected to wear. In today’s Pieces of History post, you can read more about how women’s pivotal role in the workforce during WWII greatly influence the fashion trends of the decade. National Archives Identifier: 514684.

    Reblogged from: usnatarchives
  2. How The 'Kung Fu Fighting' Melody Came To Represent Asia : Code Switch : NPR

  3. As if I needed an excuse to detest Al Jolson: according to the Stanwyck bio I’m reading*, he attacked the actress when she was a young dancing girl.

*A Life of Barbara Stanwyck: Steel True, 1907-1940 by Victoria Wilson

    As if I needed an excuse to detest Al Jolson: according to the Stanwyck bio I’m reading*, he attacked the actress when she was a young dancing girl.

    *A Life of Barbara Stanwyck: Steel True, 1907-1940 by Victoria Wilson

  4. thebegats:

Death certificate for my mother’s first cousin, age 17, in 1947, pre-Roe v. Wade. Note causes and “manner or means” of death. cc: derasso

    thebegats:

    Death certificate for my mother’s first cousin, age 17, in 1947, pre-Roe v. Wade. Note causes and “manner or means” of death. cc: derasso

    Reblogged from: thebegats
  5. ourpresidents:

Lauren Bacall
September 16, 1924 - August 12, 2014
Today, we honor the singular Lauren Bacall, who died yesterday at the age of 89.  She was involved in one of the most infamous incidents of Harry S. Truman’s Vice-Presidency.
On February 10, 1945, Mr. Truman attended a stage show for servicemen at the Washington Press Club canteen, and sat down to play the piano. During his performance, someone boosted Ms. Bacall onto the top of the piano, and she sat there seductively while Mr. Truman played and photographers snapped away. Mrs. Truman was not amused.
-from the Truman Library 

    ourpresidents:

    Lauren Bacall

    September 16, 1924 - August 12, 2014

    Today, we honor the singular Lauren Bacall, who died yesterday at the age of 89.  She was involved in one of the most infamous incidents of Harry S. Truman’s Vice-Presidency.

    On February 10, 1945, Mr. Truman attended a stage show for servicemen at the Washington Press Club canteen, and sat down to play the piano. During his performance, someone boosted Ms. Bacall onto the top of the piano, and she sat there seductively while Mr. Truman played and photographers snapped away. Mrs. Truman was not amused.

    -from the Truman Library 

    Reblogged from: ourpresidents
  6. It took her an hour to write “Mississippi Goddam.” A freewheeling cri de coeur based on the place names of oppression, the song has a jaunty tune that makes an ironic contrast with words—“Alabama’s got me so upset, Tennessee made me lose my rest”—that arose from injustices so familiar they hardly needed to be stated: “And everybody knows about Mississippi, goddam!” Still, Simone spelled them out. She mocked stereotypical insults (“Too damn lazy!”), government promises (“Desegregation / Mass participation”), and, above all, the continuing admonition of public leaders to “Go slow,” a line that prompted her backup musicians to call out repeatedly, as punctuation, “Too slow!” It wasn’t “We Shall Overcome” or “Blowin’ in the Wind”: Simone had little feeling for the Biblically inflected uplift that defined the anthems of the era. It’s a song about a movement nearly out of patience by a woman who never had very much to begin with, and who had little hope for the American future: “Oh but this whole country is full of lies,” she sang. “You’re all gonna die and die like flies.”
  7. rauchbros:

    Fourty-nine years ago today, the Voting Rights Act was passed. Right now, we’re happy to be working on a new StoryCorps short about one woman’s struggle to get the right to vote.

    Look for it next year. Meanwhile, storyboard by Tim and Rafael Rosado above.

    Reblogged from: rauchbros
  8. lbjlibrary:

    Sept. 28, 1967. Accompanied by Texas Governor John Connally, LBJ heads to the US-Mexico border, recently stricken by severe flooding from Hurricane Beulah (map of region here). The slow-moving storm has cut a broad swath of destruction. A 14-foot surge swept across South Padre Island, in the Gulf of Mexico, and the overflowing Rio Grande flooded houses to the rooftops in Harlingen, TX. 

    Both sides of the border have been devastated, and volunteers, especially medical personnel, have responded with an outpouring of assistance. The US Army has even dispatched aid helicopters to remote areas of Mexico like Comales (map). 

    LBJ is on his way to visit a high school-turned-emergency hospital in Rio Grande City that (according to the President’s Daily Diary) houses 1,500 to 2,000 people, 99% of them Mexican nationals. 

    LBJ photo via LBJ Library, #A4871-24, public domain. Other photos via The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. Lots more in their digital archives here. More on Beulah via NOAA.

    Reblogged from: lbjlibrary
  9. "It doesn’t end my involvement with Texas history," Collins said. "It’s my intention to keep accumulating, keep collecting, and once I’ve lived with whatever I buy for a month, I’ll be shipping it here. I’m kind of a bit of a magnet now for things relating to the Texas revolution." That’s a fascinating idea—that Phil Collins is now, essentially, the ongoing curator and buyer for an all-new Texas revolution museum at the Alamo grounds—and though it’ll take some time before it’s actually on display, the first items will be shipped over in October.
  10. vintageblackglamour:

Thank you Ruby Dee. Thank you… “I believe that often young performers, lacking a continuity of experience, lacking a knowledge of the history of entertainment, of the tradition and great contributions that our people have made to theater, may tend to feel that a whole new world begins with each newcomer. Not so…. I maintain that we actresses must concern ourselves more with the fate of each other, and of the younger actresses coming along, by helping to find material and getting it produced and by promoting scholarships for intensive training.” ~ Ruby Dee, from an article she wrote for the April 1966 issue of Negro Digest entitled “Tattered Queens: Some Reflections on the Negro Actress.” In this photo, she is shown with baseball legend Jackie Robinson in a scene from the movie, “The Jackie Robinson Story,” where she played his wife, Rachel. Ms. Dee died at the age of 91 on Wednesday, June 11, 2014 at her home in New Rochelle, New York. Photo: Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library

    vintageblackglamour:

    Thank you Ruby Dee. Thank you… “I believe that often young performers, lacking a continuity of experience, lacking a knowledge of the history of entertainment, of the tradition and great contributions that our people have made to theater, may tend to feel that a whole new world begins with each newcomer. Not so…. I maintain that we actresses must concern ourselves more with the fate of each other, and of the younger actresses coming along, by helping to find material and getting it produced and by promoting scholarships for intensive training.” ~ Ruby Dee, from an article she wrote for the April 1966 issue of Negro Digest entitled “Tattered Queens: Some Reflections on the Negro Actress.” In this photo, she is shown with baseball legend Jackie Robinson in a scene from the movie, “The Jackie Robinson Story,” where she played his wife, Rachel. Ms. Dee died at the age of 91 on Wednesday, June 11, 2014 at her home in New Rochelle, New York. Photo: Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library

    Reblogged from: 2brwngrls
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