1. Boyhood: What If It Were Girlhood? – Flavorwire

  2. The other thing is in Hollywood, you don’t want to show weakness as a woman because it is such a misogynist industry. To ever go to work and be like, ‘I have debilitating cramps,’ you can’t do that. You can’t be like, ‘Can I have a hot water bottle for my stomach?’ You have to act like you’re a superhero in order to be taken seriously or put on an equal playing field as the men. As soon as you like have a woman’s body and have women’s issues, it’s like, ‘Oh, you’re a hazard for us,” basically. So you just have to pretend that you’re a lot stronger than you are a lot of the time.
  3. asie:

    Jenny Lewis - ‘Just One of the Guys’ (features Kristen Stewart, Anne Hathaway and Brie Larson)

    Man, Kristen Stewart’s hair is perfection.

    Reblogged from: asie
  4. 100percentmen:

All the Supreme Court justices who voted in favor of Hobby Lobby.

    100percentmen:

    All the Supreme Court justices who voted in favor of Hobby Lobby.

    Reblogged from: 100percentmen
  5. The question of whether he’s a predator seems like it should come down to fact. But Wallace treats that question as a matter of opinion, too. And that’s not because he’s a bad reporter, or because the article isn’t impressively thorough. It’s because Wallace is writing it from within a culture that thinks a woman’s experience is a matter of debate.
  6. Bringing in a Strong Female Character™ isn’t actually a feminist statement, or an inclusionary statement, or even a basic equality statement, if the character doesn’t have any reason to be in the story except to let filmmakers point at her on the poster and say “See? This film totally respects strong women!”
  7. Laverne Cox: "I Absolutely Consider Myself a Feminist" | Dame Magazine

  8. I don’t think there’s any such thing as male objectification,” Manganiello added with a shrug when asked about his own voyeur-inviting nudity. “I think that word exists only with women because there are societal pressures for them to behave a certain way and to look a certain way. Someone put it to me once: Women are sex objects and men are success objects. That was really interesting to me.
  9. Content Used to Be King. Now It’s the Joker.  — Climate Confidential — Medium

    4. I’m tired of making rich, white dudes seem more thoughtful than they are. Yeah, I said it. Something about this whole game smacks of sexism, on top of the usual “let them eat cake” attitude corporate types have toward creative types in general (“I know! Why don’t we hire a journalist to write this think-piece? They’re all desperate for cash, they’d be happy to take this on for way less than we pay anyone else.”) Most of the ghost writers and content producers I know are women, ditto the journalists-turned-internal editors and “content strategists” for companies, and 90 percent of their work is for male CEOs. There are various factors at work here, of course. Founding and leading a successful company entitles one to a certain amount of cachet and that’s just giving credit where it’s due. Plus there are legitimate thought leaders in every industry, including media and journalism (although they’re all also mostly white dudes). But in addition to all that, underpinning this new content world is an unsettling image of a bunch of women scurrying around behind the scenes to make the boss-man look good, and an even more unsettling message: Your ideas will only be taken seriously if they are articulated by a white, male CEO.
  10. Thirty Rock’s a romantic place, and there are so many romantic things about it. The costumes have been there forever. You look in a pair of pants, and in Sharpie it says GILDA in them,” Slate says of her time on the show. “But it was a really weird disappointment when I got there and realized how foolish it was that what I expected it would be was from the expectations of a 7-year-old. And that they didn’t actually want my creative input as a woman.
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