1. The dearth of black women in influential Hollywood roles, and Theron’s failure to understand the gravity of a critique of the driving force that impacts employment prospects, and Stanley’s disaster of a review, by no means exist independently of one another, and none of them need be actively malicious in order to cause harm. They are all bound together by a unifying thread: the inability or unwillingness to see black women as fully human, fully women and worthy of complex, multi-faceted characterizations on screen that reflect the full spectrum of our lives and our emotions.
  2. It’s by having more women and more people of color running shows that you stop having to talk about it all the time, and nobody wants to talk about it all the time.
  3. I left my home for a myriad of unsexy reasons—mainly, I wanted to live a life for myself, one of my own design, removed from limitations, uninhibited by the glaring heat of my mother’s co-dependency—but also to get away from you, the aunties, the entity that wanted to Ziploc me into a tiny digestible package, removed from my peculiar ilk. According to all of you, and vicariously through my mother, I am not allowed to live my life in a way that is emotionally better for myself. The decisions I make are wrong; unfit for a woman, culturally deplorable.
  4. Right now, in freethought, the jesters fancy themselves intellectuals, and the intellectuals cavort like jesters, and the women among them wake up with the hangover.
  5. a self-perpetuating cycle can come into play, at least in legacy companies. Men are in charge, and are more likely to promote other men. Women see fewer women rising to top jobs and grow more likely to leave journalism. Thus, fewer women are around to apply for those promotions. Men become even more likely to promote other men to both the most important posts in the business and the jobs that serve as steps toward them.
  6. Whether in South Africa or Ferguson, Missouri, the rules most of us live by hardly seem to apply to white men.
  7. (via This Is What a Farmer Looks Like | Mother Jones)
  8. Girls’ limited access to equipment and encouragement is often cited as the reason for the disproportionately low number of women in music, but the male-dominated sphere of music journalism also imposes discrete critical standards upon women.
  9. katherinestasaph:

    • Sandra Trim da Costa, Miles Davis’ publicist (facilitating an interview)
    • Taylor Swift (being interrupted by Kanye)
    • Rihanna (being abused; using social media)
    • Miley Cyrus (making better music as Hannah Montana — interesting, if they mean it, but a tangent — becoming Miley2K3)
    • Madonna (getting sub-Facebook-posted by deadmau5, “[representing] everything awful about the commercial music industry and celebrity industrial complex”)
    • Paris Hilton (being tweeted about by deadmau5)
    • Ronnie Spector (being abused)
    • Kim Kardashian (being married to Kanye)
    • Laura Palmer (a fictional character)
    • Britney Spears (marrying Kevin Federline)
    • Bianca Jagger (apocryphically riding a white horse into Studio 54)
    • Blondie (is a band, but at this point I’ll count it; making “extremely satisfying uptempo songs)

    Aside from Trim da Costa, who’s referred to periodically doing publicist stuff, and Miley Cyrus, who gets a couple sentences, everyone here is an offhand mention. 

    Reblogged from: katherinestasaph
  10. usnatarchives:

"Jenny on the Job" was a series of posters issued by the Public Health Services in 1943 created by artist Kula Robbins. This specific poster is titled "Jenny on the Job - Wears styles designed for victory", depicting what women working in the factories and around machines were expected to wear. In today’s Pieces of History post, you can read more about how women’s pivotal role in the workforce during WWII greatly influence the fashion trends of the decade. National Archives Identifier: 514684.

    usnatarchives:

    "Jenny on the Job" was a series of posters issued by the Public Health Services in 1943 created by artist Kula Robbins. This specific poster is titled "Jenny on the Job - Wears styles designed for victory", depicting what women working in the factories and around machines were expected to wear. In today’s Pieces of History post, you can read more about how women’s pivotal role in the workforce during WWII greatly influence the fashion trends of the decade. National Archives Identifier: 514684.

    Reblogged from: usnatarchives
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