1. a self-perpetuating cycle can come into play, at least in legacy companies. Men are in charge, and are more likely to promote other men. Women see fewer women rising to top jobs and grow more likely to leave journalism. Thus, fewer women are around to apply for those promotions. Men become even more likely to promote other men to both the most important posts in the business and the jobs that serve as steps toward them.
  2. Whether in South Africa or Ferguson, Missouri, the rules most of us live by hardly seem to apply to white men.
  3. (via This Is What a Farmer Looks Like | Mother Jones)
  4. Girls’ limited access to equipment and encouragement is often cited as the reason for the disproportionately low number of women in music, but the male-dominated sphere of music journalism also imposes discrete critical standards upon women.
  5. katherinestasaph:

    • Sandra Trim da Costa, Miles Davis’ publicist (facilitating an interview)
    • Taylor Swift (being interrupted by Kanye)
    • Rihanna (being abused; using social media)
    • Miley Cyrus (making better music as Hannah Montana — interesting, if they mean it, but a tangent — becoming Miley2K3)
    • Madonna (getting sub-Facebook-posted by deadmau5, “[representing] everything awful about the commercial music industry and celebrity industrial complex”)
    • Paris Hilton (being tweeted about by deadmau5)
    • Ronnie Spector (being abused)
    • Kim Kardashian (being married to Kanye)
    • Laura Palmer (a fictional character)
    • Britney Spears (marrying Kevin Federline)
    • Bianca Jagger (apocryphically riding a white horse into Studio 54)
    • Blondie (is a band, but at this point I’ll count it; making “extremely satisfying uptempo songs)

    Aside from Trim da Costa, who’s referred to periodically doing publicist stuff, and Miley Cyrus, who gets a couple sentences, everyone here is an offhand mention. 

    Reblogged from: katherinestasaph
  6. usnatarchives:

"Jenny on the Job" was a series of posters issued by the Public Health Services in 1943 created by artist Kula Robbins. This specific poster is titled "Jenny on the Job - Wears styles designed for victory", depicting what women working in the factories and around machines were expected to wear. In today’s Pieces of History post, you can read more about how women’s pivotal role in the workforce during WWII greatly influence the fashion trends of the decade. National Archives Identifier: 514684.

    usnatarchives:

    "Jenny on the Job" was a series of posters issued by the Public Health Services in 1943 created by artist Kula Robbins. This specific poster is titled "Jenny on the Job - Wears styles designed for victory", depicting what women working in the factories and around machines were expected to wear. In today’s Pieces of History post, you can read more about how women’s pivotal role in the workforce during WWII greatly influence the fashion trends of the decade. National Archives Identifier: 514684.

    Reblogged from: usnatarchives
  7. Margarita Noriega of Fusion: 'Women In Tech' Is A Framing Device With Limited Value

    Women in tech are often relegated to talking about “being a woman in tech.” What needs to change so women can instead be highlighted for their contributions?

    The popularity of the debate about “women in tech” has always been a funny (confusing) thing to me. I don’t think the core issue around gender and employment has ever been limited to women just in the IT industry. I think women are the “issue” everywhere, all the time. We live in a world which thinks women are a problem. What needs to change for women is for society to stop thinking of women as a problem, and to start treating people with different kinds of physical makeups as equal members of the human race. There are other kinds of people who have trouble breaking into tech, too, who are not women. Why not address the real issue of the fear of the “other”?

    I will raise a slightly academic point that I believe needs to be raised more often: Women in tech aren’t an issue if you understand technology in a broad sense. Women are nurses, women are bioengineers, women manage all sorts of machines in a lot of capacities and industries which require a high level of technical skill. Women in tech is a framing device that has limited value. This is not to say that women are common in executive roles or even in any role in startups, but women are considered a problem with or without coding or executive skills. We live in a world where being born a woman is a dangerous proposition.

  8. Mo’Ne Davis’ story is truly compelling, but it’s a little cynical for SI to be suddenly enamored of this rare girl who can win at a man’s sport for only a brief moment, before returning to its regularly scheduled programming (largely, men winning at men’s sports).
  9. No one is disputing that Gunn was a major force behind “Guardians of the Galaxy.” The question is why he is so unwilling to share even a sliver of the spotlight with the woman who saw the movie potential in the “Guardians” comics, first introduced to the Marvel universe in 1969 by Arnold Drake.
  10. There’s a moment where Jamie Fraser, the handsome Scottish fella, tells an AWOL Claire, “Shall I pick you up and throw you over my shoulder? Do you want me to do that?” and you, if you’re a male viewer, realize: oh, this was not actually made for me. Which is a crazy feeling, let me tell you! Because most everything on cable TV is made for dudes! So while there are moments where things get sci-fi-corny — Claire’s ominous palm-reading in the reverend’s kitchen; all the misty portent around MacStonehenge; Bear McCreary’s Hobbits-on-the-Titanic score — Outlander is a nice break from the pummeling of BROOD BROOD BROOD SHOOT SHOOT SHOOT that so populates the cable landscape, especially pay cable. Outlander is an epic, dark, expensive production that doesn’t give a fuck if it ever gets watched in a “man cave,” and that is goddamn refreshing.
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