1. What happens when a director makes two movies from different viewpoints using the same plotline, then compiles them into one project? Director Ned Benson made two versions of The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby — one from the viewpoint of Conor (Him) and one from Eleanor’s point of view (Her). If, as I did, you expect the compilation of the two films (Them) to include these differing takes, sorry to say that is not the case. Instead of the experimental feeling the trailer hints at, the film The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: Them shares similarities with other grief-filled indie relationship dramas (Rabbit Hole and Rachel Getting Married specifically come to mind). What sets it slightly apart is the rhythm of this couple’s tragic story and the intensity of the actors’ performances. [Review: The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby | Slackerwood]

    What happens when a director makes two movies from different viewpoints using the same plotline, then compiles them into one project? Director Ned Benson made two versions of The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby — one from the viewpoint of Conor (Him) and one from Eleanor’s point of view (Her). If, as I did, you expect the compilation of the two films (Them) to include these differing takes, sorry to say that is not the case.

    Instead of the experimental feeling the trailer hints at, the film The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: Them shares similarities with other grief-filled indie relationship dramas (Rabbit Hole and Rachel Getting Married specifically come to mind). What sets it slightly apart is the rhythm of this couple’s tragic story and the intensity of the actors’ performances.

    [Review: The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby | Slackerwood]
  2. For Cinephiles, Netflix Is Less and Less an Option | KQED Arts

    Mark Taylor is KQED’s senior interactive producer for arts and culture and teaches media theory and criticism at USF and the Art Institutes of California. He’s on Netflix’s five DVDs-at-at-a-time plan, which costs $27.99 a month ($33.99 including Blu-ray) and has long used Netflix to preview films he’s considering teaching in class. But he says he can no longer rely on the service for research the way he once did.

    “My experience is that you end up with a bunch of things that have a very long wait and then they never come,” he said. “Things that were once available aren’t anymore.” Nine of the films at the top of his DVD queue are very long waits, he said, “sitting there forever.”

    I’ve noticed this! Especially as I was compiling the list of options for watching movies for feministfilmclub; I find it ridiculous that Netflix doesn’t have a copy of Christopher Strong to rent.

  3. There’s a story about [Civil Rights activist] Fannie Lou Hamer that we’ve been trying to get off the ground with Alfre Woodard to play the lead and Harry Belafonte as one of the producers. Another is a limited series about the life of Louis Armstrong, which Charles Dutton and I took around a couple years ago. I just pitched a TV series about James Michener’s Alaska, about the history of Alaska right after the United States bought it, which people really don’t know much about and would make a great miniseries. I’ve gotten to know the sons of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, who were given the electric chair for espionage in the ’50s, and they’ve always wanted a movie or TV series about their parents’ case. So I’ve actually written the script for that already.
  4. The Keeping Room Movie Review: The Civil-War-Set Feminist Film You Didn't Know You Wanted

    hmmm.

  5. feministfilmclub:

I Will Follow, 2010. Directed by Ava DuVernay.
Beautifully-lit film about a woman moving out of the house she shared with her aunt. Things we especially noticed: Omari Hardwick’s luscious eyelashes, the great casting (J pointed out that the actors playing the cousin and her son even look related), intricate details in the set design.
Also notable that U2 is discussed in this film and we happened to watch it when the band is in the news with their Apple promotion.
The DVD is available to rent from Netflix.

    feministfilmclub:

    I Will Follow, 2010. Directed by Ava DuVernay.

    Beautifully-lit film about a woman moving out of the house she shared with her aunt. Things we especially noticed: Omari Hardwick’s luscious eyelashes, the great casting (J pointed out that the actors playing the cousin and her son even look related), intricate details in the set design.

    Also notable that U2 is discussed in this film and we happened to watch it when the band is in the news with their Apple promotion.

    The DVD is available to rent from Netflix.

    Reblogged from: feministfilmclub
  6. shadowandact:

Watch First Full Trailer for 2014 Film Festival Darling ‘Girlhood’ (‘Bande de Filles’)
    Reblogged from: 2brwngrls
  7. what’s genuinely gross about that industry is its utter reductiveness. Year after year, it boils film culture down to a horse race, treating movies as competitors riding “momentum” or battling a “backlash” or overcoming a “snub,” rather than as what they (or at least the best of them) are: art. Yet what’s particularly odd about Oscar obsession is its built-in cognitive dissonance — every year we drool and fume and predict, as though it is all Very Important Work, while simultaneously acknowledging that nobody actually takes the judgments of Oscar voters very seriously, because they are so wrong, so very often.
  8. Conversations in the first half of The Congress happen to her, with men spouting monologues about their early lives or breaking down for her the mistakes she made in her career. The film opens to Wright quietly crying as her agent Al (Harvey Keitel) berates her for her faulty decision-making. These men want what’s best for her, you see. They just want to profit off her as well. (via Review: The Congress | Slackerwood)
    Conversations in the first half of The Congress happen to her, with men spouting monologues about their early lives or breaking down for her the mistakes she made in her career. The film opens to Wright quietly crying as her agent Al (Harvey Keitel) berates her for her faulty decision-making. These men want what’s best for her, you see. They just want to profit off her as well.
    (via Review: The Congress | Slackerwood)
  9. I’ve never seen a film like Wild where the woman ends up with no man, no money, no family, no opportunity, but she still has a happy ending.
  10. velocipedestrienne:

    ellewcee:

    popculturebrain:

    New Trailer: ‘Gone Girl' - Oct 3

    Lost it at Casey Wilson screaming “Where’s your wife Nick??”

    When this played last night I was like “Is that Casey Wilson??” I love it. I can’t wait.

    If Casey Wilson is in this, I might have to change my mind about not wanting to see it

    Reblogged from: velocipedestrienne
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