explore-blog:


You display the true marks of a Great Gourmande … which always includes the warmest and most generous of natures … and is why people who love to eat are always the best people.

A lovely letter from legendary chef Julia Child,  born 101 years ago today, to her best friend and entrepreneurship comrade in arms, Avis DeVoto.

If you love Jula Child and epistolary relationships, you gotta read As Always, Julia.

explore-blog:

You display the true marks of a Great Gourmande … which always includes the warmest and most generous of natures … and is why people who love to eat are always the best people.

A lovely letter from legendary chef Julia Child,  born 101 years ago today, to her best friend and entrepreneurship comrade in arms, Avis DeVoto.

If you love Jula Child and epistolary relationships, you gotta read As Always, Julia.

archivesofamericanart:

The Armory Show wasn’t the only big event in 1913 - it was also the year that suffragists marched on Washington to demand women’s right to vote. In light of that centennial anniversary, which is being celebrated this weekend, and the kickoff of Women’s History Month, it seemed like a good time to present you with this declaration from Nancy Spero.
Nancy Spero letter to Lucy R. Lippard, 1971 Oct. 29. Lucy R. Lippard papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

archivesofamericanart:

The Armory Show wasn’t the only big event in 1913 - it was also the year that suffragists marched on Washington to demand women’s right to vote. In light of that centennial anniversary, which is being celebrated this weekend, and the kickoff of Women’s History Month, it seemed like a good time to present you with this declaration from Nancy Spero.

Nancy Spero letter to Lucy R. Lippard, 1971 Oct. 29. Lucy R. Lippard papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

lbjlibrary:

We interrupt this regularly scheduled LBJ Time Machine: 

To tell y’all that we have posted the 1934 love letters between LBJ and Lady Bird, available in full for the very first time, on the web. You can find them here: searchable, downloadable, and transcribed.

LBJ and Lady Bird met on September 5, 1934 and  ”committed matrimony,” as Lady Bird described it, on November 17 of that same year. These 90-odd letters are their correspondence during the time of their (brief) courtship, while he was in Washington and she was in Texas. Enjoy—and Happy Valentine’s Day, from us to you. 

— LBJ Presidential Library Archives Staff

therumpus:


It was a year ago yesterday we launched Letters In The Mail. It’s been a learning process, and we’re still learning. It’s a struggle, always, to stay relevant and interesting without repeating yourself. The Sun Magazine does this particularly well. The most recent letter, from Rumpus artist Jason Novak, is unlike any we’ve sent before.


So today we’re announcing our third Letters To Each Other. The way it works is you send us a letter, no more than one page (front and back OK), and a self addressed stamped envelope. We send you five letters back and photocopy your letter and send it out to five other people. We encourage you to put your mailing address on your letter, you might end up with a pen pal. Also, make sure you send a large enough envelope as your SASE (a #9 or #10). If your envelope is smaller than that you won’t get back as many letters.


You have to be a subscriber to Letters In The Mail to participate. Obviously, we’re not making any money on this, it’s just a cool thing to connect people. We found the response was better the first time when it was only open to subscribers, than the second time when we allowed anyone to participate. If you’re a subscriber and you need the address to mail your letter, send an email to  karen@therumpus.net. (via Letters To Each Other III - The Rumpus.net)


My sis and I got my mom Letters in the Mail for Christmas… I’m totally passing this on to her.

therumpus:

It was a year ago yesterday we launched Letters In The Mail. It’s been a learning process, and we’re still learning. It’s a struggle, always, to stay relevant and interesting without repeating yourself. The Sun Magazine does this particularly well. The most recent letter, from Rumpus artist Jason Novak, is unlike any we’ve sent before.

So today we’re announcing our third Letters To Each Other. The way it works is you send us a letter, no more than one page (front and back OK), and a self addressed stamped envelope. We send you five letters back and photocopy your letter and send it out to five other people. We encourage you to put your mailing address on your letter, you might end up with a pen pal. Also, make sure you send a large enough envelope as your SASE (a #9 or #10). If your envelope is smaller than that you won’t get back as many letters.

You have to be a subscriber to Letters In The Mail to participate. Obviously, we’re not making any money on this, it’s just a cool thing to connect people. We found the response was better the first time when it was only open to subscribers, than the second time when we allowed anyone to participate. If you’re a subscriber and you need the address to mail your letter, send an email to  karen@therumpus.net(via Letters To Each Other III - The Rumpus.net)

My sis and I got my mom Letters in the Mail for Christmas… I’m totally passing this on to her.

washingtonpoststyle:

Earliest known usage of “OMG,” in a 1917 letter to Winston Churchill.
via Shaun Usher at Letters of Note

washingtonpoststyle:

Earliest known usage of “OMG,” in a 1917 letter to Winston Churchill.

via Shaun Usher at Letters of Note

Saturday History Lesson: Flannery O’Connor And Betty Hester - The Rumpus.net

Most people writing to their favorite authors do not, I’d guess, think they will get an answer back, and perhaps Betty Hester didn’t either. She was not a scholar and she was not a writer, herself. She was a 32-year-old clerk at a credit bureau in Atlanta the first time she wrote to Flannery O’Connor, in the middle of July 1955. Hester read a great deal, and she had been taken by A Good Man is Hard to Find. Hester had been surprised to see that The New Yorker hated the collection — “all we have, in the end, is a series of tales about creatures who collide and drown, or survive to float passively in the isolated sea of the author’s compassion, which accepts them without reflecting anything.”

Hester wrote to O’Connor to object. “These are stories about God, aren’t they?”

newyorker:

Life and Letters

Losing the mixed pleasures of just arrived letters may not mean as much  in the end as what we’re missing by not writing them. Writing regularly  to several people—a parent, a friend who’s moved to another coast, a  daughter or son away at college—requires one to keep separate mental  ledgers, storing up the weather or the idle thoughts or the disasters we  need to pass on. We’re always getting ready to write. The letters out  and back become a correspondence, and mysteriously take on a tone of  their own: some rambly and comfortably boring; others cool and funny;  some financial; some confessional. They stick in the mind and seem worth  the trouble.

- In this week’s issue, Roger Angell writes about the decline of the U.S. Postal Service and what we’re missing by not writing letters http://nyr.kr/vGd98S

I had a pen pal through elementary school and junior high: a friend from summer camp. We discussed pop culture, boys, and more.  E-mail is just not the same as receiving a letter on teal stationary upon which the lyrics of Martika’s “Toy Soldiers” are handwritten.

newyorker:

Life and Letters

Losing the mixed pleasures of just arrived letters may not mean as much in the end as what we’re missing by not writing them. Writing regularly to several people—a parent, a friend who’s moved to another coast, a daughter or son away at college—requires one to keep separate mental ledgers, storing up the weather or the idle thoughts or the disasters we need to pass on. We’re always getting ready to write. The letters out and back become a correspondence, and mysteriously take on a tone of their own: some rambly and comfortably boring; others cool and funny; some financial; some confessional. They stick in the mind and seem worth the trouble.

- In this week’s issue, Roger Angell writes about the decline of the U.S. Postal Service and what we’re missing by not writing letters http://nyr.kr/vGd98S

I had a pen pal through elementary school and junior high: a friend from summer camp. We discussed pop culture, boys, and more.  E-mail is just not the same as receiving a letter on teal stationary upon which the lyrics of Martika’s “Toy Soldiers” are handwritten.

"…my brother, from Pittsfield, Mass., writes to inform me I have no right to foster my ideas on other people, and that furthermore the only real red-blooded Americans are the Republicans. YE GODS."

Julia Child, letter to Avis DeVoto, 12/15/1952 (via As Always, Julia).  This book is just delicious, and I’m only 22 pages in!

Jennifer Cline of Monroe, Mich., never expected to receive a response to her three-page handwritten letter. The president’s embossed stationery arrived three weeks later. [Presidential letters: Obama connects to the people by reading his mail - washingtonpost.com]

Jennifer Cline of Monroe, Mich., never expected to receive a response to her three-page handwritten letter. The president’s embossed stationery arrived three weeks later.
[Presidential letters: Obama connects to the people by reading his mail - washingtonpost.com]