"There were two people above all others who she wanted to read [Half of a Yellow Sun]: her father and Chinua Achebe. Her agent sent it to the latter without telling her, and then called her one day and told her to sit down, she had good news. Then she read Adichie his comment – “We do not usually associate wisdom with beginners, but here is a new writer endowed with the gift of ancient storytellers” – at which she burst into tears."

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: ‘Don’t we all write about love? When men do it, it’s a political comment. When women do it, it’s just a love story’ | Books | The Guardian

christinaaar:

“You get all this praise for your good behavior but inside you’re seething. I was fairly dutiful, and I felt that way. I’ve always loved that line from Flannery O’Connor’s ‘Revelation’: ‘Go back to hell where you came from, you old wart hog.’ In Wahpeton I was a graveyard-shift waitress who wanted to destroy my customers.”
From an interview with Louise Erdrich, one of my favorite writers, inspiring me to buy some burgundy tights.

Louise Erdrich appreciation blog.

christinaaar:

You get all this praise for your good behavior but inside you’re seething. I was fairly dutiful, and I felt that way. I’ve always loved that line from Flannery O’Connor’s ‘Revelation’: ‘Go back to hell where you came from, you old wart hog.’ In Wahpeton I was a graveyard-shift waitress who wanted to destroy my customers.”

From an interview with Louise Erdrich, one of my favorite writers, inspiring me to buy some burgundy tights.

Louise Erdrich appreciation blog.

(via color-me-damned)

What Happens When You Tell People You're Reading Only Women?

This happened to me last week at book club! (When I said I was reading only female authors and authors of color this year)

The Murderer and the Manuscript

offonatangent:

Almost exactly a year ago, I received an advance copy of a debut private detective novel, a fairly common occurrence in my professional life. But the terse biographical note on this one — “he is currently serving a life sentence” — made my investigative antenna go up, as did a cursory Google search. The result, after a few bursts of reporting and traveling and rewriting and waiting for the right moment on the schedule, appears this weekend in the New York Times Magazine.

It can be a little dangerous to delve too deeply into the story behind the story of a piece, especially if there are multiple objectives and feelings to juggle. All I can say is that I hope we hear much more from Alaric Hunt the writer and the person, but that we should never forget how Joyce Austin’s life was cruelly cut short and what sort of life she might have led.

vintageanchorbooks:

"It’s interesting as a middle minority-somebody somehow in between this great black/white rift-Asian Americans are in a fabulous position to understand a lot of what’s going on because we have entree to high WASP society and there’s no radical black meeting that could be too radical for us. That’s not to say that we could make a home in either one of those, but you can be there as a fly on the wall. That’s not true of every minority in America, and it’s a wonderful vantage point from which to comment on.”
Gish Jen in an interview about “Mona in the Promised Land”

I heart Gish Jen. Been reading her for years, and I think her books keep getting better and better.

Why I Only Read Books by Women in 2013

ashleyeleigh:

flavorpill:

Read More, “Why I Only Read Books by Women in 2013

I was looking at my Goodreads page, and most of the books I read are by women by accident. This year the only books I read written by men were some comic book trades, Silver Linings Playbook and Hemlock Grove (UGH).

Out of the 90-something books I’ve read so far this year, 9 have been by men (and three of those guys are people of color, just to throw that in).  So that’s 90% books by women!

I’m trying to be better about increasing the number of POC authors I read as well.

"Because the dynamic of power and desire is so difficult to parse, teacher-student affairs have captured the minds of writers, among them David Mamet (Oleanna), Jonathan Franzen (The Corrections), Philip Roth (The Dying Animal), Christopher Isherwood (A Single Man), J. M. Coetzee (Disgrace), Zoë Heller (Notes on a Scandal), and Susan Choi (My Education). The prospect of Robert Stone, winner of a National Book Award and a two-time finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, adding his name to this list is appealing. What fearless take will the author of such muscularly bleak novels as Dog Soldiers and Damascus Gate, now a sage at 76, offer on our modern response to the intellectual/erotic dichotomy of the teacher and the prize student?"

Why Do Novelists Love Affairs Between Professors and Students? (via thenewrepublic)

I’ve never understood the continued fascination with this  — I tend to veer away from books featuring this plot device, although I did attempt Susan Choi’s My Education since it seemed like a new take on it.