1. Ursula K. Le Guin to receive NBF Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters

  2. jamiatt:

    One of the more frequent conversations I’ve had since arriving in Europe is if I plan on consistently having strong, complex female characters at the center of my books. And the answer is: Yes, because there are not enough complicated female characters represented in art and culture, there can always be more, and it is a feminist act to do so.

    Reblogged from: jamiatt
  3. The Invisible Latina

    A friend and I were driving down a street where a building had just been demolished. “What used to be there?” he asked. It was impossible to conjure up. It struck me that that is what my existence is like, and that of my mother, my sister and my daughter. Invisibility in the media makes it impossible for others to conjure up what we could possibly be doing with our lives, what we could possibly look like. And if we are doing something “unexpected” it is because there is something “exceptional” about us. This is not some strange multigenerational coincidence, this whitewashing of who we and others are is the history of our country.
  4. jamiatt:

The first pass pages. Next, a cover. Then there’s printing and binding. Someday, a thing you can hold in your hand.

can’t wait!

    jamiatt:

    The first pass pages. Next, a cover. Then there’s printing and binding. Someday, a thing you can hold in your hand.

    can’t wait!

    Reblogged from: jamiatt
  5. To me, the grounds for hope are simply that we don’t know what will happen next, and that the unlikely and the unimaginable transpire quite regularly. And that the unofficial history of the world shows that dedicated individuals and popular movements can shape history and have, though how and when we might win and how long it takes is not predictable.
    Rebecca Solnit, “Woolf’s Darkness,” Men Explain Things to Me.
  6. vintageanchorbooks:

"Lilies used to be a movie theatre, before. Students went there a lot; every spring they had a Humphrey Bogart festival, with Lauren Bacall or Katherine Hepburn, women on their own, making up their minds. They wore blouses with buttons down the front that suggested the possibilities of the word ‘undone’. These women could not be undone; or not. They seemed to be able to choose.” —from THE HANDMAID’S TALE by Margaret Atwood RIP Lauren Bacall (1924-2014)

    vintageanchorbooks:

    "Lilies used to be a movie theatre, before. Students went there a lot; every spring they had a Humphrey Bogart festival, with Lauren Bacall or Katherine Hepburn, women on their own, making up their minds. They wore blouses with buttons down the front that suggested the possibilities of the word ‘undone’. These women could not be undone; or not. They seemed to be able to choose.”
    —from THE HANDMAID’S TALE by Margaret Atwood

    RIP Lauren Bacall (1924-2014)

    Reblogged from: vintageanchorbooks
  7. vintageanchorbooks:

    Please join us in wishing Gish Jen a happy birthday — she was born on Long Island, New York on this day in 1955.

    To have no particular aim was to open grand possibilities; even at her know-nothing age, she knew that.
    ― Gish Jen, Who’s Irish?: Stories

    Gish Jen, hooray!

    Reblogged from: vintageanchorbooks
  8. awesomepeoplereading:

Gaiman reads.
nypl:

Author Neil Gaiman reads everywhere, “but especially on trains!” There’s nothing like traveling with a good book. Have your travels taken you to any great reading spots? Show us with the hashtag #ireadeverywhere!


hey, that’s what I’m reading!

    awesomepeoplereading:

    Gaiman reads.

    nypl:

    Author Neil Gaiman reads everywhere, “but especially on trains!” There’s nothing like traveling with a good book. Have your travels taken you to any great reading spots? Show us with the hashtag #ireadeverywhere!

    hey, that’s what I’m reading!

    Reblogged from: awesomepeoplereading
  9. therumpus:

    We’re beyond bummed to let you know that Roxane Gay is leaving the Rumpus to focus on other endeavors (like her two new books, the recent novel An Untamed State and the imminently forthcoming essay collection Bad Feminist). Roxane is as much a part of the site as anyone, and we hope she won’t be stranger around here.

    Luckily, she’s leaving us in good hands. We’re happy to welcome Mary-Kim Arnold as our new Essays Editor! You can get to know Mary-Kim on tumblrtwitterfacebook, and instagram—and of course, here on the Rumpus.

    Reblogged from: therumpus
  10. Roxane Gay’s ‘Bad’ Feminism - NYTimes.com

    WHOO HOO!

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