1. Roxane Gay’s ‘Bad’ Feminism - NYTimes.com

    WHOO HOO!

  2. vintageanchorbooks:

    "You can’t ignore politics, no matter how much you’d like to."
    Molly Ivins

    Reblogged from: vintageanchorbooks
  3. awesomepeoplereading:

E. B. White reads, writes, and thinks that just maybe dogs should give him editorial advice after they’ve authored several enduring classics of children’s literature.

    awesomepeoplereading:

    E. B. White reads, writes, and thinks that just maybe dogs should give him editorial advice after they’ve authored several enduring classics of children’s literature.

    Reblogged from: awesomepeoplereading
  4. I don’t know, Karl Ove, I don’t really see how any of this bolsters your case; to the contrary, it seems to reinforce archaic views about the “traditional” roles of men and women, all of which were pretty happily discarded circa 1972 with the release of Free To Be You and Me (which, btw, I highly recommend for you.) Granted, we may have taken a few steps back since that golden era of first-wave feminism and sexual liberation (there was the whole AIDS thing too), but literature—unless you see yourself as the next Ayn Rand—should tear down the walls that constrain us, not reinforce them. (At least as I see it.) Like every non-heterosexual, I take enough abuse as it is, Karl Ove: I don’t need to suffer through 600 more pages of you whispering your kneejerk, hateful, conservative bullshit into my thoughts to offer my opinion.
  5. powells:

    Mary Rodgers, who has died aged 83, was a composer and songwriter whose 1959 musical Once Upon a Mattress, based on a Hans Christian Andersen story, The Princess and the Pea, is played constantly throughout the US. She was part of a line of musical theatre composers: Richard Rodgers, of Rodgers and Hammerstein, was her father, and her son Adam Guettel is now in the business.” Via The Guardian

    Reblogged from: powells
  6. The Softest Parts of Ourselves

    roxanegay:

    I got into something of a cooking frenzy, yesterday. I blame Ina, because I was watching her show and she made this summer pasta dish and I thought, “I can make this and then I won’t have to cook again between now and when I go out of town on Thursday.”

    The previous night, I fell asleep…

    If you aren’t already following Roxane, get to it.

    Reblogged from: roxanegay
  7. Obituary: Walter Dean Myers

    Phoebe Yeh, v-p, publisher, Crown Books for Young Readers, who had worked with Myers since 1995, said, “I got to know Walter by working with him on his books: gritty urban fiction about artists, writers, basketball players, a kid in a juvenile facility, a high school shooting. There was a poem about a soldier in Vietnam that received the Jane Addams Peace Award (an irony that we loved); a soccer novel that he co-wrote with a teen. He was a Renaissance man. He collected photos and memorabilia, he was a Cordon Bleu chef, he made pate for his cat. He played multiple instruments. There were conversations about London theatre (good and bad), beloved Connie and Chris. And visits to juvenile facilities. He told me, “I want to talk to the kids that never get visits. I could have been one of those kids. I want them to know what I’ve learned – that you should never give up. That there is always hope for a second chance.”
  8. therumpus:

nationalbook:

Many congratulations to all the talented writers on the Center for Fiction’s longlist for the Flaherty-Dunnan First Novel Prize!
The list includes Tiphanie Yanique, Bret Anthony Johnston, and Josh Weil.

AN UNTAMED STATE!


I added a good number of these to my Goodreads queue yesterday (I already own An Untamed State, but haven’t ventured into it yet).

    therumpus:

    nationalbook:

    Many congratulations to all the talented writers on the Center for Fiction’s longlist for the Flaherty-Dunnan First Novel Prize!

    The list includes Tiphanie Yanique, Bret Anthony Johnston, and Josh Weil.

    AN UNTAMED STATE!

    I added a good number of these to my Goodreads queue yesterday (I already own An Untamed State, but haven’t ventured into it yet).

    Reblogged from: therumpus
  9. romancecanon:

    image

    WHOO HOO! Which reminds me I forgot to say that I sent a link from my Shadowdance review to Kristen Callihan and she told me it made her day. =)

    Reblogged from: romancecanon
  10. Romance is something that can enter your life and leave again. In a perfect world, we wouldn’t disparage people for what they happen to be reading at a given point any more than we disparage people for musical choices. The impact of that article was these people are stupid because they’re not challenging themselves to learn about the blood trade in diamonds. I think there’s time in life to learn about the blood trade in diamonds and to learn about something else.

    Novelist Eloisa James on Anti-Romance Bias — Vulture

    Ms. James makes some false generalizations about her readers in this interview (for ex: “The women buying romance don’t give a damn what is said in The New Republic. They’ve never even heard of it.”), but it’s still worth a read. (via romancecanon)

    With that New Republic comment, James really shoots herself in the foot. Her whole point is that romance readers aren’t stupid. So why insult their intelligence by assuming none of them have heard of The New Republic?  She could’ve said if doesn’t matter if they’ve heard of it or not because knowing the name of one publication isn’t a sign of intelligence.

    Side note: I don’t like her books very much. I tried. I really did. But nah.

    (via ashleyeleigh)

    There are a few of her books I love (her latest one is delightful), but some not so much (there’s one I even hated so much I didn’t get past the second chapter). Yeah, for a lot of this interview, I thought, really???

    Reblogged from: ashleyeleigh
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