1. How The 'Kung Fu Fighting' Melody Came To Represent Asia : Code Switch : NPR

  2. nprmusic:

    Standing on a balcony in her hometown, watch Ledisi stop an unsuspecting crowd, and all the hustle and bustle of the French Quarter, dead in its tracks.

    Love this so much.

    Reblogged from: npr
  3. nprmusic:

    To a barber shop of captivated men, watch R&B singer Jazmine Sullivan premiere “Stupid Girls,” a new song that warns women to be careful with their hearts.

    Reblogged from: npr
  4. Clips from their new album! [After Learning To Loosen Up, Spoon Readies Its Return: The All Songs Interview : All Songs Considered : NPR]
  5. In 2014, The Classical World Still Can’t Stop Fat-Shaming Women : Deceptive Cadence : NPR:


After a week full of discussions about gender and the newsroom in the U.S., a pile of weekend reviews arrived from London, courtesy of five older male critics writing about an emerging Irish mezzo-soprano named Tara Erraught. Erraught is singing Octavian in the Strauss opera Der Rosenkavalier at the Glyndebourne Festival, which opened Saturday night.
What is stunningly apparent is just how much a woman’s body matters onstage — way more, if these five critics are to be believed, than her voice, her technique, her musicality or any other quality…
——————-
I find it astounding that across five widely read publications, not a single editor saw fit to go back to the writer and challenge what he had written. Yes, visuals matter — even more now, in the age of live broadcasts — but these critics have seized this as license to forget why anybody shows up at an opera house to begin with.

    In 2014, The Classical World Still Can’t Stop Fat-Shaming Women : Deceptive Cadence : NPR:

    After a week full of discussions about gender and the newsroom in the U.S., a pile of weekend reviews arrived from London, courtesy of five older male critics writing about an emerging Irish mezzo-soprano named Tara Erraught. Erraught is singing Octavian in the Strauss opera Der Rosenkavalier at the Glyndebourne Festival, which opened Saturday night.

    What is stunningly apparent is just how much a woman’s body matters onstage — way more, if these five critics are to be believed, than her voice, her technique, her musicality or any other quality…
    ——————-
    I find it astounding that across five widely read publications, not a single editor saw fit to go back to the writer and challenge what he had written. Yes, visuals matter — even more now, in the age of live broadcasts — but these critics have seized this as license to forget why anybody shows up at an opera house to begin with.
  6. nprchives:

    This weekend marks Carl Kasell’s last show as the scorekeeper of Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me. Here are the original publicity photos from Wait Wait — which librarian Jane Gilvin dug up in our archives. 

    (More photos and audio clips from Carl’s career live here.) 

    (Ed note: I used to work at Wait Wait and took a lot of photos there. Here are all of my photos from Wait Wait 2007-2009.) 

    Reblogged from: nprchives
  7. Women On Capitol Hill Reach Across Party Lines To Get Things Done : NPR

  8. nprmusic:

Vote For Your Favorite Albums Of 2013


Had to write in Charli XCX & Sky Ferreira, who were left off the ballot for some reason.
(Besides Vampire Weekend, all my picks were ladies.)

    nprmusic:

    Vote For Your Favorite Albums Of 2013

    Had to write in Charli XCX & Sky Ferreira, who were left off the ballot for some reason.

    (Besides Vampire Weekend, all my picks were ladies.)

    Reblogged from: npr
  9. npr:

    Indian School Deaths: A Village’s Pain Compounded By Poverty

    Above: Chandra Devi lost two of her children last week when they consumed a free school lunch in Gandaman village, India. They were among 23 children who died in the tragedy.

    Below: The empty classroom where the students were served meals tainted with pesticide.

    "We are small people. What can we really do about this?" asks Surendra Prasad, perched on the steps outside the Patna Medical College and Hospital in the state capital of Bihar in eastern India.

    Inside, two of his young children are recovering in the intensive care unit. His wife has also been admitted, in shock after another child, their 10-year-old daughter, Mamta, died along with 22 other children who ate a free school midday meal in their village last Tuesday. Authorities say the food was tainted with high concentrations of toxic insecticide.

    Mamta’s grandmother breaks down describing how the little girl slipped away.

    "She was saying to me, ‘Don’t worry — everything will be all right,’ then suddenly she died," says the elderly woman, her face etched in grief.

    Read the rest of the story on NPR’s Parallels blog.

    (Photos: Anoo Bhuyan/NPR)

    heartbreaking.

    Reblogged from: npr
  10. The blurred messages Thicke, Cyrus and others are now sending fit a time when people think of themselves as products, more than ever before.
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