The orange-and-black velvet ensemble Marian Anderson wore during her historic Easter Sunday performance on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on April 9,1939, is on view to mark the 75th anniversary of the concert. 
American History Museum, 2nd Floor, East Wing
Washington, DC
April 8. 2014 - September 7, 2014

The orange-and-black velvet ensemble Marian Anderson wore during her historic Easter Sunday performance on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on April 9,1939, is on view to mark the 75th anniversary of the concert. 

American History Museum, 2nd Floor, East Wing

Washington, DC

April 8. 2014 - September 7, 2014

(Source: coolchicksfromhistory)

life:

On the anniversary of her landmark 1939 concert at the Lincoln Memorial, we present photos of Marian Anderson and the concert that sparked the Civil Rights movement. See the photos here on LIFE.com.
(Thomas D. McAvoy—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

life:

On the anniversary of her landmark 1939 concert at the Lincoln Memorial, we present photos of Marian Anderson and the concert that sparked the Civil Rights movement. See the photos here on LIFE.com.

(Thomas D. McAvoy—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

vintageblackglamour:

Marian Anderson, the elegant and groundbreaking contralto who was the first African American to sing at the Metropolitan Opera, was born 116 years ago today in Philadelphia. She is probably best known to this generation for singing before a crowd of 75,000 at the Lincoln Memorial in 1939, after being refused permission to sing at Constitution Hall by the Daughters of the American Revolution. DAR has made the effort to make up for the slight ever since, inviting Ms. Anderson to sing at the hall on many occasions soon after the infamous 1939 incident. In this photo, Ms. Anderson is shown arriving at Victoria Station in London on November 11, 1936, for her performance at Queen’s Hall. Photo: Bettman/Corbis

vintageblackglamour:

Marian Anderson, the elegant and groundbreaking contralto who was the first African American to sing at the Metropolitan Opera, was born 116 years ago today in Philadelphia. She is probably best known to this generation for singing before a crowd of 75,000 at the Lincoln Memorial in 1939, after being refused permission to sing at Constitution Hall by the Daughters of the American Revolution. DAR has made the effort to make up for the slight ever since, inviting Ms. Anderson to sing at the hall on many occasions soon after the infamous 1939 incident. In this photo, Ms. Anderson is shown arriving at Victoria Station in London on November 11, 1936, for her performance at Queen’s Hall. Photo: Bettman/Corbis

legrandcirque:

Carl Van Vechten, Marian Anderson, 1940.
Source: Library of Congress

legrandcirque:

Carl Van Vechten, Marian Anderson, 1940.

Source: Library of Congress

I’ve never seen this amazing 1955 shot of Marian Anderson before.  It’s so kinetic and flowing.  The photos I usually see of the opera singer are very staid. [Avedon And Marian Anderson At Smithsonian - The Picture Show Blog : NPR]Yes, I just used the word “kinetic” to describe a photograph.

I’ve never seen this amazing 1955 shot of Marian Anderson before. It’s so kinetic and flowing. The photos I usually see of the opera singer are very staid. [Avedon And Marian Anderson At Smithsonian - The Picture Show Blog : NPR]

Yes, I just used the word “kinetic” to describe a photograph.