1. nypl:

We are deeply saddened to hear of the loss of Emmy and Tony Award winning actress Elaine Stritch, whose acerbic personality and memorable stage and screen performances have captured hearts for decades. This 1954 promotional photo from our Billy Rose Theatre Division features Stritch as Peggy Porterfield in a revival of “On Your Toes,” and captures her personalty perfectly. Learn more about the American Theater Hall of Famer by checking out materials from your local NYPL branch.  

    nypl:

    We are deeply saddened to hear of the loss of Emmy and Tony Award winning actress Elaine Stritch, whose acerbic personality and memorable stage and screen performances have captured hearts for decades. This 1954 promotional photo from our Billy Rose Theatre Division features Stritch as Peggy Porterfield in a revival of “On Your Toes,” and captures her personalty perfectly. Learn more about the American Theater Hall of Famer by checking out materials from your local NYPL branch.  

    Reblogged from: nypl
  2. imwithkanye:

Elaine Stritch, Tart-Tongued Broadway Actress and Singer, Is Dead at 89 | NYT
Plainspoken, egalitarian, impatient with fools and foolishness, and admittedly fond of cigarettes, alcohol and late nights — she finally gave up smoking and drinking in her 60s — though she took it up again — Ms. Stritch might be the only actor to work as a bartender after starring on Broadway, and she was completely unabashed about her good-time-girl attitude.
“I’m not a bit opposed to your mentioning in this article that Frieda Fun here has had a reputation in the theater, for the past five or six years, for drinking,” she said to a reporter for The New York Times in 1968. “I drink and I love to drink, and it’s part of my life.”
[more]

    imwithkanye:

    Elaine Stritch, Tart-Tongued Broadway Actress and Singer, Is Dead at 89 | NYT

    Plainspoken, egalitarian, impatient with fools and foolishness, and admittedly fond of cigarettes, alcohol and late nights — she finally gave up smoking and drinking in her 60s — though she took it up again — Ms. Stritch might be the only actor to work as a bartender after starring on Broadway, and she was completely unabashed about her good-time-girl attitude.

    “I’m not a bit opposed to your mentioning in this article that Frieda Fun here has had a reputation in the theater, for the past five or six years, for drinking,” she said to a reporter for The New York Times in 1968. “I drink and I love to drink, and it’s part of my life.”

    [more]

    Reblogged from: barbarastanwyck
  3. vintageanchorbooks:

“One Half of the World does not know how the other Half lives,” Franklin once wrote. His sister is his other Half.” ― Jill Lepore, Book of Ages: The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin
From one of our most accomplished and widely admired historians—a revelatory portrait of Benjamin Franklin’s youngest sister, Jane, whose obscurity and poverty were matched only by her brother’s fame and wealth but who, like him, was a passionate reader, a gifted writer, and an astonishingly shrewd political commentator.Making use of an astonishing cache of little-studied material, including documents, objects, and portraits only just discovered, Jill Lepore brings Jane Franklin to life in a way that illuminates not only this one extraordinary woman but an entire world. 

One of my favorite reads of 2014 so far!

    vintageanchorbooks:

    “One Half of the World does not know how the other Half lives,” Franklin once wrote. His sister is his other Half.” 
    ― Jill LeporeBook of Ages: The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin

    From one of our most accomplished and widely admired historians—a revelatory portrait of Benjamin Franklin’s youngest sister, Jane, whose obscurity and poverty were matched only by her brother’s fame and wealth but who, like him, was a passionate reader, a gifted writer, and an astonishingly shrewd political commentator.

    Making use of an astonishing cache of little-studied material, including documents, objects, and portraits only just discovered, Jill Lepore brings Jane Franklin to life in a way that illuminates not only this one extraordinary woman but an entire world. 

    One of my favorite reads of 2014 so far!

    Reblogged from: vintageanchorbooks
  4. Reblogged from: womenincaps
  5. These songs, which presume to assure women that they are attractive (and, by extension, worthwhile), assume that the singer’s relationship to our bodies overrules our relationship with them. All of our primping — our “fixing makeup, just so” — has a pointed objective, namely to be found attractive by men. And allegedly, what a relief to find out we don’t need to be doing any of it at all!
  6. sarapocock:

It’s Dotty from Pee-wee’s Big Adventure!  Come see this piece and others this weekend at Paging Mr. Herman: A Pee-Wee Herman Art Retrospective.

Digital prints available for $15—email me if interested.

    sarapocock:

    It’s Dotty from Pee-wee’s Big Adventure!  Come see this piece and others this weekend at Paging Mr. Herman: A Pee-Wee Herman Art Retrospective.

    Digital prints available for $15—email me if interested.

    Reblogged from: sarapocock
  7. elevator-loveletter:

featureshoot:

Bryan Schutmaat

This photo brings to mind this Leighton painting I’ve seen at the Kimbell.  Perhaps it’s the rural setting, the composition of the shot, and the female’s direct gaze at the viewer. I’ll post the Leighton painting separately so you can compare.

    elevator-loveletter:

    featureshoot:

    Bryan Schutmaat

    This photo brings to mind this Leighton painting I’ve seen at the Kimbell.  Perhaps it’s the rural setting, the composition of the shot, and the female’s direct gaze at the viewer. I’ll post the Leighton painting separately so you can compare.

    Reblogged from: elevator-loveletter
  8. "The vast majority of the people here do not take the warnings seriously because it’s not clear where they are supposed to evacuate to," [NBC’s Ayman Mohyeldin] said.
  9. Reblogged from: valentinovamp
  10. barbarastanwyck:

    Happy Birthday Barbara Stanwyck!
    (July 16, 1907-January 20, 1990)

    When we were shooting Golden Boy, the stages were dingy, dirty, and poorly ventilated. And the film wasn’t as fast in those days as it is now which necessitated the use of more electrical equipment, which, in turn, created heat. So anyone working from 8:45 in the morning until 7:30 at night could find it to be an exhausting experience. But when we would wrap production, and the staff and the cast and the crew would head for fresh air and home, very often Barbara would say to me "Golden Boy, get your ass into that set dressing room because we’re going to run tomorrow’s work." For an extra half to three quarters of an hour we would rehearse. She wanted me to be good. So if anyone ever needed a term for courtesy and consideration, generosity, and above all, professionalism, they would only need two words. One: Barbara. And the other: Stanwyck.

    -William Holden

    Reblogged from: barbarastanwyck
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