I'll tumble 4 ya.

Sep 18

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“As an article in the new issue of TIME reveals, Bono, Edge, Adam Clayton and Larry Mullen Jr believe so strongly that artists should be compensated for their work that they have embarked on a secret project with Apple to try to make that happen, no easy task when free-to-access music is everywhere (no) thanks to piracy and legitimate websites such as YouTube. Bono tells TIME he hopes that a new digital music format in the works will prove so irresistibly exciting to music fans that it will tempt them again into buying music—whole albums as well as individual tracks. The point isn’t just to help U2 but less well known artists and others in the industry who can’t make money, as U2 does, from live performance. “Songwriters aren’t touring people,” says Bono. “Cole Porter wouldn’t have sold T-shirts. Cole Porter wasn’t coming to a stadium near you.”” —

Exclusive: U2 and Apple Have Another Surprise for You

If we think the present is wrong, we want the past to have been right, and to have existed in an eternal, unchanging state of rightness. But just as U2’s falling sales are the result (at least in part) of having been released in the MP3 era, Cole Porter’s success was equally as much the result of his unique historical circumstances. His success on Broadway was only possible because of the mass urbanization that had taken place in America over the last 50 years. The success of his songs independent of the stage relied on two inventions only recently popularized: radio and recorded music. Had Porter been working 20 years earlier, he would have had to rely on sheet music and home pianos for his music to spread, and would have consequently composed in a different way—and, presumably, a less successful one. We are all the product of historical circumstance, and while it is important to recognize the ways in which the present moment is different from those that came before, we have only two options for how to deal with these changes: adapt our own behavior to the new environment, or work to push through changes that will bring about some other new, more beneficial context. But there is no going back; culture is, as statisticians say, path-dependent, always determined by what came before. To pretend otherwise is de-plorable.

(Source: barthel)

(Source: sesamestreet)

“CBS’s The Good Wife begins its sixth season on Sunday night in almost unheard of shape for a drama heading into the latter stages of middle age. By Seasons 7 or 8, most series are thinking about retirement, or ought to be. Typically they’ve been flagging for years, the vim and vigor of their youth long since mellowed. But The Good Wife does not know from flagging. As it begins its sixth season, it is sharper than it has ever been, the ageless, wiry athlete sprinting circles around other dramas, tacitly talking trash. “Anything you can do, I can do 22 times a year, without cursing, without much violence, and without a hoity-toity cable-TV address,” it winks, as it runs by in some impeccably tailored workout gear. The Good Wife, a delectable, invigorating series of unprecedented depth and cynicism, is the best drama on TV.” — The Good Wife Season 6 starts Sunday. The CBS show is better than ever.

What happens when a director makes two movies from different viewpoints using the same plotline, then compiles them into one project? Director Ned Benson made two versions of The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby — one from the viewpoint of Conor (Him) and one from Eleanor’s point of view (Her). If, as I did, you expect the compilation of the two films (Them) to include these differing takes, sorry to say that is not the case. Instead of the experimental feeling the trailer hints at, the film The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: Them shares similarities with other grief-filled indie relationship dramas (Rabbit Hole and Rachel Getting Married specifically come to mind). What sets it slightly apart is the rhythm of this couple’s tragic story and the intensity of the actors’ performances. [Review: The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby | Slackerwood]

What happens when a director makes two movies from different viewpoints using the same plotline, then compiles them into one project? Director Ned Benson made two versions of The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby — one from the viewpoint of Conor (Him) and one from Eleanor’s point of view (Her). If, as I did, you expect the compilation of the two films (Them) to include these differing takes, sorry to say that is not the case.

Instead of the experimental feeling the trailer hints at, the film The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: Them shares similarities with other grief-filled indie relationship dramas (Rabbit Hole and Rachel Getting Married specifically come to mind). What sets it slightly apart is the rhythm of this couple’s tragic story and the intensity of the actors’ performances.

[Review: The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby | Slackerwood]

Sep 17

The Mating Call of Roger Goodell — Or, What’s Really Happening to Sports Journalism Today | Ordinary Times -

The real purpose of sports journalism over my adult life hasn’t been to perform journalism. It’s been to act as the PR arm of businesses sports journalism needed to succeed in order to make money for sports journalism.

“There are 1,696 active players in the NFL. Even if, as FiveThirtyEight’s Benjamin Morris found, NFL players are arrested on domestic assault charges at rates that are, relative to income level, “downright extraordinary,” very few of them will ever beat women. Most of them are good guys trying to do a job. Still, the job they do is part of a culture of aggression. Football is a pantomime of war, down to the pseudo-military tactics. But it is not a pantomime of violence. It is actual violence.” — Together We Make Football «

Sep 16

Austin's "black problem" is a class problem -

The more I think about it, the more I see part of the new civil rights battle in Austin being waged over land, property and stratospheric rents.

stayinbedgrowyrhair:

valerina:

Good fucking riddance, you poetic nuisance.

this motherfucker wants 8 stars for the privilege of putting up with his bullshit. i had dudes i dated for three days wanting 13. there’s not a single redeemable hetero/bi man in the entire kim k game, i’m sure of it. 

truth. Also, what is up with all their clothes-shaming?

stayinbedgrowyrhair:

valerina:

Good fucking riddance, you poetic nuisance.

this motherfucker wants 8 stars for the privilege of putting up with his bullshit. i had dudes i dated for three days wanting 13. there’s not a single redeemable hetero/bi man in the entire kim k game, i’m sure of it.

truth. Also, what is up with all their clothes-shaming?

“I left my home for a myriad of unsexy reasons—mainly, I wanted to live a life for myself, one of my own design, removed from limitations, uninhibited by the glaring heat of my mother’s co-dependency—but also to get away from you, the aunties, the entity that wanted to Ziploc me into a tiny digestible package, removed from my peculiar ilk. According to all of you, and vicariously through my mother, I am not allowed to live my life in a way that is emotionally better for myself. The decisions I make are wrong; unfit for a woman, culturally deplorable.” — A Letter To My Aunties | The Hairpin